????????????????????

🖐 HTTP Error 403

Most Liked Casino Bonuses in the last 7 days 🎰

Filter:
Sort:
A7684562
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

These 21 Rare Nintendo Games Are Worth A Fortune By Fox Van Allen on. the original Stadium Events is one of the most collectible NES games of all time. It could be worth more than $1,000 to the.


Enjoy!
HTTP Error 403
Valid for casinos
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
are old games worth anything

TT6335644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

If you still have the original boxed games they can go for a tidy sum these days, especially the first few. Recently the first three games sold online for around $280 combined.


Enjoy!
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Valid for casinos
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
SLIDESHOW 15 classic PC games you should play again Text adventures.
We round up all the games you should've played back when you are old games worth anything 64MB of SDRAM.
Between a flood of HD remasters, and all the games styled to look like older gamesreleased in the past year, I think we can all agree retro games are back in style.
But what about actual retro games—the classics you've left gathering dust in old CD-ROM cases or are hoarding in your GOG.
April's a relatively slow month as far as new releases, so maybe it's the perfect time to revisit some old classics.
I'm about to go replay Planescape: Torment.
Read on for that and fourteen ish other classic games you should play again.
Before Pillars of Eternity, there were the Infinity Engine games.
Of that fairly large collection of isometric RPGs, the two that stand above the rest are and.
Baldur's Gate II has a decent story for a fantasy game, but is mostly notable for being https://agohome.ru/are/what-are-some-fun-online-games-for-free-to-play.html massive.
Planescape: Torment is iconic for its dialogue and story—you can even avoid combat completely, if you're good enough.
Modern perspective: Baldur's Gate II: Enhanced Edition is a decent albeit buggy option if you want a slightly modernized version of the game—widescreen, plus some small mechanics tweaks.
Otherwise these games are about as approachable now as they were upon release.
The game is a blend of both exploration and really satisfying turn-based combat, with you controlling an army of mythical creatures led by the titular heroes.
There've been a lot of Heroes of Might and Magic games over the years, but if you can look past the dated graphics then this third entry is simply the best.
Modern perspective: I beg of you: Stay away from the HD version Ubisoft released earlier this year.
Yeah, the graphics are better.
Yeah, widescreen is nice.
But most of the content is missing, due to some issues with lost source code.
You're better off sticking with the original plus expansions.
You'll meet people in the games industry who still play Deus Ex once per year.
The key to Deus Ex is choice, both in terms of story and mechanics.
Levels are almost infinitely replayable, due to the enormous number of ways you could approach each objective.
This is level design stretched to its absolute limits, and never before nor since have we had a game that gave players this much freedom.
No, not even in the game's two sequels.
Modern perspective: The biggest obstacle to playing Deus Ex is the opening level.
Liberty Island is commonly considered the worst level in the whole game.
Just push through it.
Fact: Space sims are great.
Fact: Space sims are even better when they're Star Wars-branded.
After an interminable wait, the classic Star Wars games finally made their way to a store again, and chief amongst them are and.
Modern perspective: The one major downside?
The definitive CD versions of both games aren't currently available.
The CD versions upped the resolution, added full voiceovers, and improved the cutscenes, so it's a shame they're not included yet.
Maybe down the road?
Or you could just play.
Maybe you played point-and-click puzzler Myst—after all, it held the record for best-selling PC game for nearly a decade—but did you play its sequel?
Bigger, bolder, and more sure of itself, Riven is every bit as much a classic as its predecessor, and also forms a more cohesive whole.
Plus now you can just download it instead of needing to install five or six different CD-ROMs.
Modern perspective: On the other hand, be prepared to beat your head against a wall.
Riven is fiendishly difficult at times.
And it just laughs at your big dumb brain.
Probability of your consulting a walkthrough: 99 percent.
Okay, "a person" celebrated in the streets.
I did a little dance.
The spiritual predecessor to BioShock, System Shock 2 will feel familiar—first-person, heavy emphasis on story, et cetera—but with a creepy "survival horror in space" feel.
Not only is it a good game in its own right, it's also influenced are old games worth anything much every shooter to come after.
Modern perspective: Install some graphics mods.
Make the game really shine the way it should.
System Shock 2 is beloved enough that you have some great options on modern systems.
Oh and by the way: It's difficult.
It's easily one of the longest, deepest adventure games ever made, with one of the greatest worlds in all of gaming history—and it released right when the point-and-click genre basically died off.
Modern perspective: Some of the puzzles are asinine, so be prepared to consult a walkthrough.
It's worth it for the story though.
And lucky for you, when you're done you won't have to wait eight years.
With a recent Kickstarter campaign tonow would be a perfect time for you to re visit the mother of all CRPGs.
Playing all of the Ultima games would take forever though, so you might as well start with the best—either or.
The two play very different Ultima 7 uses a top-down perspective, while Underworld 2 is first-person but they have one thing in common: They're both phenomenal RPGs.
Set aside dozens of hours for these adventures.
Disappointed by last year's?
Well, it is admittedly hard to live up to being the spiritual are old games worth anything oflargely considered to be one of the best if not the best 4X games ever created.
Modern perspective: It's basically Civilization's turn-based strategy, but in space.
Civilization II, to be exact.
It's not as pretty as booting up Civilization V, obviously, but it's not too hard to puzzle out.
And if you're looking for more space-based strategy, try out.
I have a tendency to recommend a lot too muchso I thought I'd choose a different golden-era point-and-click this time around:.
This murder-mystery game is really just incredible, from its rotoscoped art style to its unique setting riding on a train in 1914 under the specter of World War I to the fact that the plot progresses in real-time.
Fun fact: The game was written by Jordan Mechner, who created Prince of Persia.
Modern perspective: As far as point-and-clicks go, The Last Express is pretty approachable.
That being said, the fact that the game progresses in real-time means two things.
If you love the idea of the isometric CRPG but don't really care for fantasy settings, try instead.
Yes, this is what Fallout was before Bethesda turned it into " Elder Scrolls with guns.
I love Fallout 3.
There's a quality and a humor to the writing in Fallout 2, though, that puts it on a higher level—a cleverness that just didn't quite make it into Bethesda's iteration.
It's a damn good CRPG.
Modern perspective: If you're coming over from Fallout 3, this is going to take some more info used to.
However, if you have any experience with isometric CRPGs you should be fine.
A Mind Forever Voyaging is a text adventure nowadays known as "interactive fiction" that's as much an indictment of certain political leanings as it is an examination of the nature of being human.
It's also one https://agohome.ru/are/are-cash-games-or-tournaments-more-profitable.html the most ambitious text adventures of the era, with time constantly advancing and an enormous amount of locations to see.
Who needs graphics, when you've got a story this good?
Sure, it's not exactly on par with Brave New World and 1984 the way Infocom claimed, but it's still excellent in part because it's a game and not a novel.
Modern perspective: The hardest part of playing A Mind Forever Voyaging nowadays is finding a copy.
A legal copy, that is.
Also, the game came with "feelies"—physical items packed into the box that are online slots legal in the us be helpful to have on hand while playing.
No, I'm not talking about the 2012 shooter.
I'm talking about the game that game was "based on," the 1993 isometric tactics game from Bullfrog.
Basically, you're the leader of a global megacorporation, and your https://agohome.ru/are/what-games-are-out-for-ps4-camera.html goal is.
Be the best megacorporation on Earth.
To do so, you hire a group of mercenaries to do click to see more really shady things, because that's how the world works in 2096.
The game consists primarily of directing these mercenaries through various levels.
Modern perspective: The UI and graphics are the biggest hamper to enjoying Syndicate nowadays, but they're sort of charming in a retro-cyberpunk way.
Also, as of the time are old games worth anything writing thanks to EA's On the House program, so get on it.
In the 90s, especially with the advent of CD storage, we went through this weird phase known as "FMV Games," short for full-motion video.
Basically, instead of using computer graphics people would shoot film clips of live actors.
It's a quintessentially 90s genre, and the pinnacle was.
You play as the titular Tex, a film noir detective for the post-apocalypse.
Modern perspective: The game's got some fairly stupid puzzles, but luckily there's a pretty decent hint system built in.
You might might actually be able to complete this one without a walkthrough, which click high praise for a 90s adventure game.
Duke is like that obnoxious are old games worth anything who showed up at your party uninvited, drank all your beer, creeped everyone out, broke something, threw up on your floor, and then passed out.
And is Duke at his Dukiest.
If you want to play one shooter to understand what the 90s FPS scene was like, Duke Nukem 3D is a pretty good choice.
Modern perspective: Some of the pop culture references don't really hold up, but that's okay.
Also, the game is a 90s shooter, so expect it to be fast.
Way faster than whatever you're currently playing.
After we published this list, readers pointed out some big, gaping holes in it—and we listened.
Now that you know the golden oldies that we still love to play, check out the reader picks for.
PCWorld helps you navigate the PC ecosystem to find the products you want and the advice you need to get the job done.

A67444455
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

Metal Slug has grown to be a legendary title, well-known for its fast action, fluid animation and sense of humour. It's also been ported to just about anything that's able to play games, from the.


Enjoy!
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Valid for casinos
HTTP Error 403
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
RARE ATARI GAMES WORTH MONEY - MOST VALUABLE ATARI GAMES!!

A7684562
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

I personally bought an old 1960 Mille Bornes game on eBay. I wanted the old game for sentimental reasons, but I wasn't willing to pay too much for it. When I was shopping for those, there were some at around $20.00 USD, but with patience I found one for $12.60 USD including shipping.


Enjoy!
HTTP Error 403
Valid for casinos
HTTP Error 403
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
are old games worth anything

JK644W564
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

25 Highly Valuable Games You Might Actually Own. They're usually mass produced, made from a mix of cardboard and plastic, and only act to carry digital information that could feasibly be copied onto any computer. Thanks to collectors though, there are many video games that are worth tens of thousands, and they could be sitting in your collection right now.


Enjoy!
The best classic PC games still worth playing | PCWorld
Valid for casinos
The best classic PC games still worth playing | PCWorld
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
Stupidly EXPENSIVE & Rare Playstation 2 (PS2) Games

G66YY644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

Estate sales and eBay are the main sources for finding vintage Monopoly games. Collectors monitor eBay activity daily, and quickly snatch up any Monopoly games or Monopoly items of value that appear there. eBay has both helped and hurt Monopoly Game collecting. It has brought much more product to the market, which has lowered prices.


Enjoy!
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Valid for casinos
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
are old games worth anything

CODE5637
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

You may not realize it, but those old VHS tapes you probably have stored away could be potentially worth thousands. Stay in the loop! Get breaking news and big stories on your desktop.


Enjoy!
HTTP Error 403
Valid for casinos
The best classic PC games still worth playing | PCWorld
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
are old games worth anything

B6655644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

I wouldn’t attempt to sell old gaming stuff on Ebay either, I feel it’s just a huge hassle. Like I’ve got a couple of older NIS or Atlus games that would be worth a lot today but I won’t bother trying to selling them online to someone who might or might not be reliable just for a 30-40 dollars profit margin.


Enjoy!
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Valid for casinos
The best classic PC games still worth playing | PCWorld
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
are old games worth anything

BN55TO644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

Obviously, the rarer the tape is, the more valuable it is, so if everybody hadn’t thrown away that pile of tapes, we wouldn’t necessarily all have fortunes.. It’s hard to know how much something as niche as this is worth, but if you happen to still have an intact collection, put some of the horror titles into eBay and see what the market’s paying.


Enjoy!
HTTP Error 403
Valid for casinos
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
SLIDESHOW 15 classic PC games you should play again Text adventures.
We round up all the games you should've played back when you had 64MB of SDRAM.
Between a flood of HD remasters, and all the games styled to look like older gamesreleased in the past year, I think we can all agree retro games are back in style.
But what about actual retro games—the classics you've left gathering dust in old CD-ROM cases or are hoarding in your GOG.
April's a relatively slow month as far as new releases, so maybe it's the perfect time to revisit some old classics.
I'm about to go replay Planescape: Torment.
Read on for that and fourteen ish other classic games you should play again.
Before Pillars of Eternity, there were the Infinity Engine games.
Of that fairly large collection of isometric RPGs, the two that stand above the rest are and.
Baldur's Gate II has a decent story for a fantasy game, but is mostly notable for being absolutely massive.
Planescape: Torment is iconic for its dialogue and story—you can even avoid combat completely, if you're good enough.
Modern perspective: Baldur's Gate II: Enhanced Edition is a decent albeit buggy option if you want a slightly modernized version of the game—widescreen, plus some small mechanics tweaks.
Otherwise these games are about as approachable now as they were upon release.
The game is a blend of both exploration and really satisfying turn-based combat, with you controlling an army of mythical creatures led by the titular heroes.
There've been a lot of Heroes of Might and Magic games over the years, but if you can look past the dated graphics then this third entry is simply the best.
Modern perspective: I beg of you: Stay away from the HD version Ubisoft released earlier this year.
Yeah, the graphics are better.
Yeah, widescreen is nice.
But most of the content is missing, due to some issues with lost source code.
You're better off sticking with the original plus expansions.
You'll meet people in the games industry who still play Deus Ex once per year.
The key to Deus Ex is choice, both in terms of story and mechanics.
Levels are almost infinitely replayable, due to the enormous number of ways you could approach each objective.
This is level design stretched to its absolute limits, and never before nor since have we had a game that gave players this much freedom.
No, not even in the game's two sequels.
Modern perspective: The biggest obstacle to playing Deus Ex is the opening level.
Liberty Island is commonly considered the worst level in the whole game.
Just push through it.
Fact: Space sims are great.
Fact: Space sims are even better when they're Star Wars-branded.
After an interminable wait, the classic Star Wars games finally made their way to a store again, and chief amongst them are and.
Modern perspective: The one major downside?
The definitive CD versions of both games aren't currently available.
The CD versions upped the resolution, added full voiceovers, and improved the cutscenes, so it's a shame they're not included yet.
Maybe down the road?
Or you could just play.
Maybe you played point-and-click puzzler Myst—after all, it held the record for best-selling PC game for nearly a decade—but did you play its sequel?
Bigger, bolder, and more sure of itself, Riven is every bit as much a classic as its predecessor, and also forms a more cohesive whole.
Plus now you can just download it instead of needing to install five or six different CD-ROMs.
Modern perspective: On the other hand, be prepared to beat your head against a wall.
Riven is fiendishly difficult at times.
And it just laughs at your big dumb brain.
Probability of your consulting a walkthrough: 99 percent.
Okay, "a person" celebrated in the streets.
I did a little dance.
The spiritual predecessor to BioShock, System Shock 2 will feel familiar—first-person, heavy emphasis on story, et cetera—but with a creepy "survival horror in space" feel.
Not only is it a good game in its own right, it's also influenced pretty much every shooter to come after.
Modern perspective: Install some graphics mods.
Make the game really shine the way it should.
System Shock 2 is beloved enough that are old games worth anything have some great options on modern systems.
Oh and by the way: It's difficult.
It's easily one of the longest, deepest adventure games ever made, with one of the greatest worlds in all of gaming history—and it released right when the point-and-click genre basically died off.
Modern perspective: Some of the puzzles are asinine, so be prepared to consult a walkthrough.
It's worth it for the story though.
And lucky for you, when you're more info you won't have to wait eight years.
With a recent Kickstarter campaign tonow would be a perfect time for you to re visit the mother of all CRPGs.
Playing all of the Ultima games would take forever though, so you might as well start with the best—either or.
The two play very different Ultima 7 uses a top-down perspective, while Underworld 2 is first-person but they are slots worth playing one thing in common: They're both phenomenal RPGs.
Set aside dozens of hours for these adventures.
Disappointed by last year's?
Well, it is admittedly hard to live up to being the spiritual predecessor oflargely considered to be one of the best if not the best 4X games ever created.
Modern perspective: It's basically Civilization's turn-based strategy, but in space.
Civilization II, to be exact.
It's not as pretty as booting up Civilization V, obviously, but are old games worth anything not too hard to puzzle out.
And if you're looking for more space-based strategy, try out.
I have a tendency to recommend a lot too muchso I thought I'd choose a different golden-era point-and-click this time around:.
This murder-mystery game is really just incredible, from its rotoscoped art style to its unique setting riding on a train in 1914 under the specter of World War I to the fact that the plot progresses in real-time.
Fun fact: The game was written by Jordan Mechner, who created Prince of Persia.
Modern perspective: As far as point-and-clicks go, The Last Express is pretty approachable.
That being said, the fact that the game progresses in real-time means two things.
If you love the idea of the isometric CRPG but don't really care for fantasy settings, try instead.
Yes, this is what Fallout was before Bethesda turned it into " Elder Scrolls with guns.
I love Fallout 3.
There's a quality and a humor to the writing in Fallout 2, though, that puts it on a higher level—a cleverness that just didn't quite make it into Bethesda's iteration.
It's a damn good CRPG.
However, if you have any experience more info isometric CRPGs you should be fine.
A Mind Forever Voyaging is a text adventure nowadays known as "interactive fiction" that's as much an indictment of certain political leanings as it is an examination of the nature of being human.
It's also one of the most just click for source text adventures of the era, with time constantly advancing and an enormous amount of locations to see.
Who needs graphics, when you've got a story this good?
Sure, it's not exactly on par with Brave New World and 1984 the way Infocom claimed, but it's still excellent in part because it's a game and not a novel.
Modern perspective: The hardest part of playing A Mind Forever Voyaging nowadays is are old games worth anything a copy.
A legal copy, that is.
No, I'm not talking about the 2012 shooter.
I'm talking about the game that game was "based on," the 1993 isometric tactics game from Bullfrog.
Basically, you're the leader of a global megacorporation, and your only goal is.
Be the best megacorporation on Earth.
To do so, you hire a group of mercenaries to do some really shady things, because that's how the world works in 2096.
The game consists primarily of directing these mercenaries through various levels.
Modern perspective: The UI and graphics are the biggest hamper to enjoying Syndicate nowadays, but they're sort of charming in a retro-cyberpunk way.
Also, as of the time of writing thanks to EA's On the House program, so get on it.
In the 90s, especially with the advent of CD storage, we went through this weird phase known as "FMV Games," short for full-motion video.
Basically, instead of using computer graphics people would shoot film clips of live actors.
It's a quintessentially 90s genre, and the pinnacle was.
You play as the titular Tex, a film noir detective for the post-apocalypse.
Modern perspective: The game's got some fairly stupid puzzles, but luckily there's a pretty decent hint system built in.
You might might actually be able to complete this one without a walkthrough, which is high praise for a 90s adventure game.
Duke are old games worth anything like that obnoxious guest who showed up at your party uninvited, drank all your beer, creeped everyone out, broke something, threw up on your floor, and then passed out.
And is Duke at his Dukiest.
If you want to play one shooter to understand what the 90s FPS scene was like, Duke Nukem 3D is a pretty good choice.
Modern perspective: Some of the pop culture references don't are old games worth anything hold up, but that's okay.
Also, the game is a 90s shooter, so expect it to be fast.
Way faster than whatever you're currently playing.
After we published this list, readers pointed out some big, gaping holes in it—and we listened.
Now that you know the golden oldies that we still love to play, check out the reader picks for.
PCWorld helps you navigate the PC ecosystem to find the products you want and the advice you need to get please click for source job done.

G66YY644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

The game could still sell for a decent amount as the watchers might be waiting to bid on the game at the last minute thinking that they will get a better deal on the game. If the game doesn’t sell I wouldn’t give up on it yet. The game is pretty old and thus there are probably not a lot of people actively looking for the game.


Enjoy!
HTTP Error 403
Valid for casinos
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
SLIDESHOW 15 classic PC games you should play again Text adventures.
We round up all the games you should've played back when you had 64MB of SDRAM.
Between a flood of HD remasters, and all the games styled to look this web page older gamesreleased in the past year, I think we can all agree retro games are back in style.
But what about actual retro games—the classics you've left gathering dust in old CD-ROM cases or are hoarding in your GOG.
April's a relatively slow month as far as new releases, so maybe it's the perfect time to revisit some old classics.
I'm about to go replay Planescape: Torment.
Read on for that and fourteen ish other classic games more info should play again.
Before Pillars of Eternity, there were the Infinity Engine games.
Of that fairly large collection of isometric RPGs, the two that stand above the rest are and.
Baldur's Gate II has a decent story for a fantasy game, but is mostly notable for being absolutely massive.
Planescape: Torment is iconic for its dialogue and story—you can even are old games worth anything combat completely, if you're good enough.
Modern perspective: Baldur's Gate II: Enhanced Edition is a decent albeit buggy option if you want a slightly modernized version of the game—widescreen, plus some small mechanics tweaks.
Otherwise these games are about as approachable now as they were upon release.
The game is a blend of both exploration and really satisfying turn-based combat, with you controlling an army of mythical creatures led by the titular heroes.
There've been a lot of Heroes of Might and Magic games over the years, but if you trivia freeki look past the dated graphics then this third entry is simply the best.
Modern perspective: I beg of you: Stay away from the HD version Ubisoft released earlier this year.
Yeah, the graphics are better.
Yeah, widescreen is nice.
But most of the content is missing, due to some issues with lost source code.
You're better off sticking with the original plus expansions.
You'll meet people in the games industry who still play Deus Ex once per year.
The key to Deus Ex is choice, both in terms of story and mechanics.
Levels are almost infinitely replayable, due to the enormous number of ways you could approach each objective.
This is level design stretched to its absolute limits, and only casinos on are indian reservations why before nor since have we had a game that gave players this much freedom.
No, not even in the game's two sequels.
Modern perspective: The biggest obstacle to playing Deus Ex is the opening level.
Liberty Island is commonly considered the worst level in the whole game.
Just push through it.
Fact: Space sims are great.
Fact: Space sims are even better when they're Star Wars-branded.
After an interminable wait, the classic Star Wars games finally made their way to a store again, and chief amongst them are and.
Modern perspective: The one major downside?
The definitive CD versions of both games aren't currently available.
The CD versions upped the resolution, added full voiceovers, and improved the cutscenes, so it's a shame they're not included yet.
Maybe down the road?
Or you could just play.
Maybe you played point-and-click puzzler Myst—after all, it held the record for are old games worth anything PC game for nearly a decade—but did you play its sequel?
Bigger, bolder, and more sure of itself, Riven is every bit as much a classic as its predecessor, and also forms a more cohesive whole.
Plus now you can just download it instead of needing to install five or six different CD-ROMs.
Modern perspective: On the other hand, be prepared to beat your head against a wall.
Riven is fiendishly difficult at times.
And it just laughs at your big dumb brain.
Probability of your consulting a walkthrough: 99 percent.
Okay, "a person" celebrated in the streets.
I did a little dance.
The spiritual predecessor to BioShock, System Shock 2 will feel familiar—first-person, heavy emphasis on story, et cetera—but with a creepy "survival horror in space" feel.
Not only is it a good game in its own right, it's also influenced pretty much every shooter to come after.
Modern perspective: Install some graphics mods.
Make the game really shine the way it should.
System Shock 2 are old games worth anything beloved enough that you have some great options on modern systems.
Oh and by the way: It's difficult.
It's easily one of the longest, deepest adventure games ever made, with one of the greatest worlds in all of gaming history—and it released right when the point-and-click genre basically died off.
Modern perspective: Some of the puzzles are asinine, so be prepared to consult a walkthrough.
It's worth it for the story though.
And lucky for you, when you're done you won't have to wait eight years.
With a recent Kickstarter campaign tonow would be a perfect time for you to re visit the mother of all CRPGs.
Playing all of the Ultima games would take forever though, so you might as well start with the best—either or.
The two play very different Ultima 7 uses a top-down perspective, while Underworld 2 is first-person but they are old games worth anything one thing in common: They're both phenomenal RPGs.
Set aside dozens of hours for these adventures.
Disappointed by last year's?
Well, it is admittedly hard to live up to being the spiritual predecessor oflargely considered to be one of the best if not the best 4X games ever created.
Modern perspective: It's basically Civilization's turn-based strategy, but in space.
Civilization II, to be exact.
It's not as pretty as booting up Civilization V, obviously, but it's not too hard to puzzle out.
And if you're looking for more space-based strategy, try out.
I have a tendency to recommend a lot too https://agohome.ru/are/what-are-some-fun-online-games-for-free-to-play.htmlso I thought I'd choose a different golden-era point-and-click this time around:.
This murder-mystery game is really just incredible, from its rotoscoped art style to its unique setting riding on a train in 1914 under the specter of World War I to the fact that the plot progresses in real-time.
Fun fact: The game was written by Jordan Mechner, who created Prince of Persia.
Modern perspective: As far as point-and-clicks go, The Last Express are old games worth anything pretty approachable.
That being said, the fact that the game progresses in real-time means two things.
If you love the idea of the isometric CRPG but don't really care for fantasy settings, try instead.
Yes, this is what Fallout was before Bethesda turned it into " Elder Scrolls with guns.
I love Fallout 3.
There's a quality and a humor to the writing in Fallout 2, though, that puts it on a higher level—a cleverness that just didn't quite make it into Bethesda's iteration.
It's a damn good CRPG.
Modern perspective: If you're coming over from Fallout 3, this is going to take some getting used to.
However, if you have any experience with isometric CRPGs you should be fine.
A Mind Forever Voyaging is a are old games worth anything adventure nowadays known as "interactive fiction" that's as much an indictment of certain political leanings as it is an examination of the nature of being human.
It's also one of the most ambitious text adventures of the era, with time constantly advancing and an enormous amount of locations to see.
Who needs graphics, when you've got a story this good?
Sure, it's not exactly on par with Brave New World and 1984 the way Infocom claimed, but it's still excellent in part because it's a game and not a novel.
Modern perspective: The hardest part of playing A Mind Forever Voyaging nowadays is finding a copy.
A legal copy, that is.
Also, the game came with "feelies"—physical items packed into the box that would be helpful to have on hand while playing.
No, I'm not talking about the 2012 shooter.
I'm talking about the game that game was "based on," the 1993 isometric tactics game from Bullfrog.
Basically, https://agohome.ru/are/are-slots-worth-playing.html the leader of a global megacorporation, and your only goal is.
Be the best megacorporation on Earth.
To do so, you hire a group of mercenaries to do some really shady things, because that's how the world works in 2096.
The game consists primarily of directing these mercenaries through various levels.
Modern perspective: The UI and graphics are the biggest hamper to enjoying Syndicate nowadays, but they're sort of charming in a retro-cyberpunk way.
Also, as of the time of writing thanks to EA's On the House program, so get on it.
In the 90s, especially with the advent of CD storage, we went through this weird phase known as "FMV Games," short for full-motion video.
Basically, instead of using computer graphics people would shoot film clips of live actors.
It's a quintessentially 90s genre, and the pinnacle was.
You play as the titular Tex, a film noir detective for the post-apocalypse.
Modern perspective: The game's got some fairly stupid puzzles, but luckily there's a pretty decent hint system built in.
You might might actually be able to complete this one without a walkthrough, which is high praise for a 90s adventure game.
Duke is like that obnoxious guest who showed up at your are old games worth anything uninvited, drank all your beer, creeped everyone out, broke something, threw up on your floor, and then passed out.
And is Duke at his Dukiest.
If you want to play one shooter to understand what the 90s FPS scene was like, Duke Nukem 3D is a pretty good choice.
Modern perspective: Some of the pop culture references don't really hold up, but that's okay.
Also, the game is a 90s shooter, so expect it to be fast.
Way faster than whatever you're currently playing.
After we published this list, readers pointed out some big, gaping holes in it—and we listened.
Now that you know the golden oldies that we still love to play, check out the reader picks for.
PCWorld helps you navigate the PC ecosystem to find the products you want and the advice you need to get the job done.

BN55TO644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

This Site Might Help You. RE: how much is my old Atari worth? I have a old Atari 7600 with both controllers the plug gear and about 40 games that are in plastic Atari folders. Game works fine with all the cool games back


Enjoy!
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Valid for casinos
HTTP Error 403
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
8 Games Worth Playing After You Finish The Story

JK644W564
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

Old video games can be worth tens of thousands of dollars Stadium Events can sell for $13,000 -- $41,300; $10,000 for the box alone Nintendo Campus Challenge (NES) can get between $14,000 -- 20,100


Enjoy!
HTTP Error 403
Valid for casinos
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
The Best Retro Games That Are Still Worth Playing

A7684562
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 500

List of rare or oop boardgames that are worth more than $100. if people knew of rare or oop games that have a high value.. collections of anything of worth to.


Enjoy!
The best classic PC games still worth playing | PCWorld
Valid for casinos
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
are old games worth anything

A7684562
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

Disney’s Haunted Mansion Game: Released only a couple of years after the ride itself opened, this 1970s game pitted 2-4 players against each other and the ever-changing floor plan of the mansion itself. Why it’s rare: Though the game was released twice, in 1972 and 1975 respectively, there simply aren’t enough complete games to satisfy demand. The Haunted Mansion itself is crazy popular, and this game really captured the creepy, fun atmosphere of the ride well.


Enjoy!
The best classic PC games still worth playing | PCWorld
Valid for casinos
The best classic PC games still worth playing | PCWorld
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
People collect a lot of things.
From sports collectibles, to books and antiques; there are collectors for everything.
Board games are no exception.
There are a lot of people that collect board games, myself included since I own hundreds of board games.
With collectors comes value so as board games have become more popular, the prices for rare board games have risen quite a bit lately.
While most board games are worth very little, there are plenty of board games worth hundreds to thousands of dollars.
Being a collector of board games for quite a few years, I have run into a lot of board games.
I have learned quite a bit about board game values from my years collecting them and this post is going to outline what I have learned.
These are only tips as there are games that will defy these tips.
Condition is not going to make a worthless game valuable but it is big in determining the value of a rare game.
A rare game in good condition can sell for multiple times more than the same game that is in poor condition.
A game that has never been played before is guaranteed to have all of the components which is key for a lot of rare games since it is hard to find parts for these games.
It can be a hassle to find the missing parts for a game and collectors will pay a premium for not having to find the pieces that a game is missing.
Sealed games are also more likely to have boxes in good to great condition which is really important to some collectors.
It is really hard to find rare games in an unopened condition.
Condition is still key even if the game is opened.
The most important thing is that the game has all of the pieces.
A game that is missing non important pieces like dice or playing pieces are less likely to be affected as games that are missing key components.
Missing even one piece, even a minor one, drops the value of most games by a significant amount but the games still have some are old games worth anything />Some collectors will buy incomplete games hoping to get the missing parts from other people.
Game pieces for rare games can also sell for a lot of money especially if it is a game that is regularly missing pieces.
If you find a rare game that has a lot of the pieces but not all of them you can make quite a bit of money selling the pieces off individually to people that are just missing a couple pieces from their copy of the game.
Just having all of the pieces is not enough for some collectors though.
The condition of the contents is important as well.
If a person is paying a https://agohome.ru/are/games-that-are-fun-and-free-online.html for a game they are looking for a game in good condition.
Creases in cards or the board, broken pieces, and other imperfections in the components will affect the value of the game.
The quality of the box in particular is really important since a lot of people like displaying their rare games so a good box is important.
Being Old Does Not Necessarily Make A Game Valuable The first check this out people think makes a game valuable is age.
If a game is old it must be valuable right?
In the world of board games that is true to a point.
Being old rarely if ever decreases the potential value of a game.
If you can find a board game from the early 1900s 1930s or earlier or even the 1800s it is likely to be worth money.
A lot of board games from the late 1800s and early 1900s were made of paper and wood.
Through the years many of the games from this era have been destroyed, damaged, lost pieces, or thrown away.
Most of the copies still in existence are already in the hands of a collector.
If you can find one though it will likely be worth a lot of money.
There are some exceptions though with a big one being the game Monopoly.
You might own a really old copy of Monopoly from the 1930s or 1940s and think it must be worth a lot of money.
Unfortunately old Monopolies are not worth nearly as much as you would expect.
The main reason is that so many copies of the game were made that despite being really old, many of the older copies of the game are still in existence.
The only old Monopolies that are actually worth a lot of money are the first copies made.
The odds of you finding really old board games is not particularly high so what about more recent games.
In most cases if the game is newer than the 1960s or 1970s, the age is not really going to affect the value.
There are a lot of valuable games made after the 1960s but they are usually valuable for one of the other reasons listed below.
Has the Average Person Heard Of It One of the first things you should ask yourself about a game is if the average person has heard of the game.
If you asked random people on the street if they know a particular game and half or more of them have heard of it, it is unlikely to be worth anything.
Your copy of Monopoly, Scrabble, Trivial Pursuit, Sorry, etc are not going to be worth anything.
With so many games made, anyone who wants the game can find a copy for cheap.
If no one wants a game because it is bad or everyone who wants the game already has a copy, the game will have no value.
Hundreds to thousands of games are made every year so there are a bunch of games that no one has heard of before.
The themes that do best ares casino older board games can be the opposite for new games are movies, television shows, cartoons, singers, sports stars and anything else from pop culture.
Games about wars and other specific events can also be sought after by collectors.
The reason these games are valuable is that there are multiple types of collectors interested in the item.
In the future more recent games may go up in value based on their theme as people become more nostalgic for the theme.
Some publishers are well known for creating fun games or games with great components which drives up the prices of their games.
Milton Bradley, Hasbro, and Parker Brothers games in particular are rarely worth anything unless they are quite old.
If you find a game from any of these companies that was made prior to 1940 though they could be worth money except for Monopoly.
Most really old board games are worth money especially if they were made by companies that no longer exist.
Games made by the in particular are worth quite a bit of money.
They were actually one of Parker Brothers biggest rivals until Parker Brothers bought them out in 1920.
A lot of these old board game companies went out of business a long time ago many during the Great Depression.
Since a lot of these really old games are already owned by collectors, there are more modern game publishers that have made a lot of valuable board games.
One company in particular is Avalon Hill.
Avalon Hill is still around even though they are currently a subsidiary of Hasbro.
Before joining Hasbro, Avalon Hill was well known for their war games and detailed strategy games.
A lot of their games were never massively produced because a lot of their titles are gauged towards specific audiences.
Their fans love their games though so some collectors are willing to pay quite a bit of money for them.
Most Avalon Hill games come with a lot of cardboard components though so they can be missing pieces.
Their main line of games were the bookshelf game series which featured board games the size of books that you could fit on your shelf.
TSR is another board game publisher that has made a lot of valuable board games.
TSR mostly made tabletop RPGs like the original Dungeons and Dragons.
Desirable Genres Some board game genres tend to be more valuable than others.
One genre in particular that creates a lot of valuable games is the war game.
War games are one of the oldest genres and have a dedicated fan base.
The more detailed the game is number of components can be a good indicator of value as well.
Avalon Hill is probably the biggest and most well known war game publisher.
Miniature games are also generally quite expensive.
Miniature games are games that use a bunch of little figures for gameplay.
An example is Warhammer 40K.
The figures generally feature a lot of detail which means they cost a lot when they were originally sold and usually hold their value over time.
Tabletop RPGs can also be quite valuable especially if they are more obscure and had only one printing.
TSR RPGs in particular can be worth quite a bit of money.
Special editions of board games usually include higher quality components which lead to higher prices.
A lot of collectors are looking for the special editions of their favorite games because they want the higher quality components.
Some special editions originally sold for hundreds to thousands of dollars.
These special editions can be worth a lot more than they originally sold for because many times there is more demand than supply.
Two ways to tell how much a game originally cost is to look at the quantity and quality of the components.
Quantity is a good way to indicate the original cost of a lot of games.
If the game comes with a lot of components outside of cards it was probably pretty expensive when it was originally made.
Games that include a lot of figures in particular are usually expensive and usually retain their value if all of the pieces are included.
Quality is also a sign of the original cost.
Obviously the special editions made with expensive materials like gold or jewels are going to be valuable just based on the materials used.
Quality is also shown in the detail put into figures and other game components.
If the game has a lot of custom components and it looks like a lot of time was spent creating the components, the game was probably pretty expensive.
The Forgotten Gems For every Monopoly, Trivial Pursuit, Scrabble, etc.
These games never became popular enough to be re-released.
Even if the games never became popular, these games do have their fans.
People remember playing these games and are longing to play them again or they just heard about them and want to try them out.
Since these games are rare due to their limited popularity, people are willing to pay quite a bit of money for them.
Most games from the 1970s to mid 1990s are generally worth very little.
A lot of these games were mass produced and the games that were popular have been reproduced many times over.
This time range is ripe for these forgotten gems though.
A lot of these games bombed and were never made again.
People enjoyed some of these games though and are willing to pay more than you would expect to relive childhood memories.
Some examples of forgotten gems include Fireball Island and Dark Tower.
Both of these games were made by Milton Bradley in the 1980s.
The reason these games are valuable is because a lot of people really like these games despite not being very popular when they first came out.
Players have lost their copies of the games over the years or people have just recently heard about the games and want their own copy of the game which drives demand for the games.
A lot of people purchase these games because they want to play a game that they missed out on when it was first released.
These cult games can really grow an audience which drives up the price.
These are the valuable board games you are most likely to find because it includes more recent games which are much easier to find since more copies were produced and they are newer so more copies are still in existence.
Adult games are usually a better bet to be valuable.
I think the main reason is that they are more enjoyable for collectors to actually play.
While some collectors might be fine with just putting the game on the shelf, most people want to play their games.
This usually leads to more valuable games.
Generally this applies more to older games than newer games since companies are starting to make games based on stranger themes as the hobby continues to grow.
Stunning Artwork Some collectors buy board games to be able to play them are old games worth anything other collectors buy board games for display purposes.
Just like some people collect records for their cover art, the same applies to board games.
Collectors who are interested in artwork want colorful and interesting artwork.
A box with generic artwork is not going to be that interesting to collectors.
If yes the game could hold some value if some of the other factors are true as well age is pretty important for box artwork.
In addition to the boxes, collectors are also interested in games with really colorful and interesting gameboards.
People like to display gameboards that have really nice artwork.
Desirable Designers Just like people have their favorite directors, a lot of people have favorite board game designers.
These people will buy almost every game made by the designer.
This means that every game made by that designer has demand.
Most well known designers have some valuable games but most of their games are not that expensive.
The designers whose whole collection is valuable are those designers that make high quality games in limited runs.
This means their games can get quite expensive.
The Game Is Actually Good While pretty obvious, if a game is good it is likely to be worth more.
Who wants to buy a bad game?
Most good games are actually pretty cheap because they are mass produced to meet demand.
These games regularly get reproduced in order to capitalize on their popularity which drives down prices.
A good place to check whether a board game is good is.
Where to Check Board Game Values and Sell Them So you think you have a valuable board game?
You now have to do your research.
Checking sites like can give you an indication of whether a game is rare.
The best way to know if a board game is valuable though is to just look it up.
The two main places to buy and sell board games are Amazon and eBay.
Of the two I personally prefer selling games on Amazon.
I prefer Amazon for one simple reason, you can usually get more for a game on Amazon than you can on eBay.
You might incur a lot of listing fees relisting an item on eBay over and over again waiting for the right person to find the item.
Amazon and Amazon buyers are a lot pickier than eBay though.
If your game is in poor condition, you android games are what the best shooting for not want to sell it on Amazon.
If the game is missing pieces I would highly recommend selling it somewhere else.
To sell on Amazon you need to read the selling guidelines closely and follow them or Amazon can revoke your selling privileges quickly.
Be sure to be thorough in your description of the item though because collectors expect the item to arrive in a condition similar to that of which you described.
If the game is not in high demand though you might have to pay listing fees every time you relist the item.
The third place I would look to sell a game is on Board Game Geek.
Board Game Geek has a marketplace where people can list games for sale.
The good thing about Board Game Geek what are online games like jam that it could be much easier to find someone who wants your game since Board Game Geek caters to board game fans.
Items in the marketplace are displayed on the page for the game that you are selling so anyone who is interested in that game will see your listing.
Your Thoughts Do you currently own any valuable board games?
What games do or did you own?
Am I missing any tips on spotting valuable board games?
Share your thoughts in the comments section.
June 29, 2016 at 10:03 am hi there, recently got some old board games and was wondering if they are worth much or not???
The first thing I would do would be to check if the games are on Amazon or eBay.
If they are on either site that should give you a pretty good idea of whether the games are valuable.
If you can find results on eBay I would recommend looking at the completed listings there is a spot on the left sidebar that lets you sort results since completed listings actually shows what an item sold for.
If the games are not on either Amazon or eBay, a good source would probably be BoardGameGeek.
BoardGameGeek is a great website to find out about more obscure board games.
Interest in the game is probably going to depend on factors such as the theme of the game, condition, and the other things I mention in the post.
I hope this helps you.
If so maybe you can answer a question.
Were games like the 1938 parker bros Lone ranger ever sold without the Box.
In other words the board and the pieces sold separately but not coming in the blue box.
Looking at Board Game Geek I think I found the game you are talking about.
The main version of the game did seem to come with a full sized box.
This version has the board and a smaller box that holds the components.
Is this the version you are talking about?
I actually think Parker Brothers did this with quite a few of their other older board games.
I wonder if this was like how today machines in north are legal carolina slot are normal and deluxe versions.
If this was the case I am guessing the version without the outer box was the cheaper version of the game.
This was well before my time though so it is just an educated guess.
I have been unable to find these anywhere to check on their value.
Can you help me please?
Based on some quick research I think one of the games could be worth a moderate amount while the other unfortunately is not going to be worth much.
If your Dallas in the Box is thisit unfortunately is not worth much.
Being a big Green Bay Packers fan I actually own a copy of the game which I hope to play soon and post a review on this site.
As far as value it tends to fluctuate a little on eBay and it is not listed on Amazon.
I think that is a little on the low side because it is currently the offseason and the game should sell for more during the football season and will probably source for themost around November to early December since you will then get Packer fans wanting to buy the game for a Christmas gift.
Condition is going to matter quite a bit though.
Does the game have all of the contents?
What does the box look like split corners, stains, creases, tears, marks, etc.
Condition is going to be important since Packer fans who want to buy the game as a collectible will likely want to display it in their homes so if the box is in good condition it will likely sell for more.
If you were thinking about selling the game I would suggest waiting until at least the start of football season and I would probably recommend waiting until closer to November due to Christmas shopping.
If you wanted to sell it I think the best options would be either or.
Taking good pictures and describing the condition of the game the best you can should help make the game sell for more.
I hope this helps.
It is in good condition and I would to know if its worth anything.
Please send me your email address so I can show you pictures of the boardgame.
I am assuming that you are talking about.
The New Game of Human Life was originally made in 1790 but was apparently reprinted at least a couple times throughout the years.
The true value of the game comes down to if it was an original printing or one of the earlier reprints.
If it is the original printing or one of the first re-prints I would guess the game could be worth hundreds to thousands of dollars.
If the game is not that old though I think it could still have some value as long as it is not a recent reprint less than 50 years old.
I wish you luck in finding out more about your game.
Usually special editions of board games can be worth quite a bit of money.
World of Warcraft is also still pretty popular so that should make the game more valuable.
Also does the package say when the game was made?
Looking at I found two different types of World of Warcraft Mahjong sets.
There were also a couple 2015 sets from Blizzcon.
I hope this helps.
Battling Tops has some value.
This is typical since most board games sell for more on Amazon than eBay.
It probably will sell for more as we get closer to Halloween though.
Of the three Kerplunk is probably worth the least.
Being the most well known game, it had more copies made and there have been several reprints of the game throughout the years.
This reduces the please click for source of the game since unless a person wants a specific version of the game you can find a cheaper new version of the game.
I hope this helps.
Personally I never heard of the board game Secret Code.
I am assuming this is an older game?
If it is an older game the copyright date may be in Roman numerals.
Looking up the game on Board Game Geek I found three results for Secret Code.
The other game I found was.
Apparently one of the names that Mastermind has used in the past is Secret Code.
It is not that uncommon for board games to go under different names in different countries.
I also looked up Hamleys on Board Game Geek and only found a couple games and none match Secret Code.
I am guessing that your game is not in the Board Game Geek catalog.
If your game is not a version of Mastermind can you send me some more information like the year or simple explanation of how the game is played and I will try to get you some more information about the game.
Due to this fact there have been a lot of different Charades games made throughout the years.
With all of these different versions of the game, none of the versions of Charades seem to be worth much.
I hope this helps with your decision of whether to open the game.
There are a couple of marks on the box and a small crease to the right side of the midline join on the board but it still lies flat when opened.
Is this a game that is sought after?
Any information you may have would be much appreciated.
Thank you in advance.
Thank you for the question.
Kingmaker is a 1974 war game about the War of the Roses which took place in 1400s England.
While Ariel made the original version of the game in 1974, two years later it was picked up by Avalon Hill who was well known for making war games.
Kingmaker has a lot of the things that you are looking for in are online slots legal in the us valuable board game.
These types of games were pretty niche since not a lot of people want to play a game about war in 1400s England.
The game was also picked up by Avalon Hill which means that it is a pretty well regarded game.
The game is actually well received by the board game community as evidenced by.
The game also has not had a recent reprint since the latest version of the game was released in 1988.
Your copy having in game show jeopardy contestants are tested of check this out pieces is also important since these older war games came with a lot of small pieces which are really easy to lose so it is hard to find a complete copy.
Looking at Amazon I found a couple versions of the game for sale.
There are a couple catches though.
This means that if you want to sell the game you will have to sell it onor somewhere else.
This is actually pretty typical of eBay since board games never sell for as much on eBay as they do on Amazon.
Board Game Geek usually has a pretty good grasp on how much a game is worth since the site is for board game enthusiasts so they generally have a good idea of what the game is worth.
So the value of the game will probably depend on where you would sell it.
I will warn you ahead of time that it could take over a year to sell on Amazon.
A positive in your case is that the game has all of the pieces.
The wear on the box and the small crease on the board may slightly affect the value but you are going to have those issues with any game from the 1970s that has been opened.
I hope this helps.
I have never heard of the the puzzle game Hitler Vs Enemy before.
To make an educated guess though I would need some more information.
You list it as a puzzle game.
Is it mostly just a puzzle or is it more of a game?
In general I would say that a game would be worth more than a puzzle but there are puzzles that can be worth quite a bit if they are old and are of a subject that people are interested in which based on the title your puzzle game would probably fit since a lot https://agohome.ru/are/what-are-the-best-android-racing-games.html people are interested in World War 2.
Is there a copyright date printed on the box?
If it is from the 1930s-1950s it could be worth a lot especially considering the topic.
There are also a lot of collectors of World War 2 memorabilia so World War 2 and board game collectors could be interested in the game.
If it is actually from the 1930s-1950s and is more of a game than a puzzle it could be worth hundreds to thousands if it is a rare game that people are actually interested in.
This is just a guess though since I could find no information about it online.
If it is more recent it could still be worth money but it is less likely to be worth a lot.
If the game was made before the 1990s it could have some value because based on the title it sounds like it might be a war game which usually had low print runs and there are collectors who really like war games.
A more recent source would have to be rare or was expensive to begin with to be worth a lot of money.
If the game looks like it would have cost quite a bit when it was first sold it could still retain some of that value.
One final thing that will matter is the condition of the game.
If the game has all of the pieces and they are in decent shape that is a positive.
If the game is missing pieces though or the pieces are in bad shape that will hurt the value.
Without being able to find anything about the game online it is kind of hard to judge the value of the game.
If you can provide me some more information about what type of game it is, the year it was made, or any other information from the box that might be helpful I could maybe give you a better answer.
Like, there are no copies I could find on either Amazon or E-bay, so I have no idea.
Before you brought the game to my attention, I had never heard of the game.
Generally the best area to find information about a board game is which you already looked at.
The game only has one version of the game on Board Game Geek so either no one has updated the page to indicate another printing run or there was only 500 copies of the game ever made.
Being made by a small company there is a good chance that there never was a second printing of the game.
On eBay I did find one copy of the game which was sold from the United Kingdom.
I think the game could be worth more than that copy sold for though.
The game probably sat for a while and the seller just wanted to get rid of it so they sold it really cheap.
The question is whether anyone is actually looking for the game.
Without much of a sales history for the game and little information on the game in general I am just making an educated guess based on the value of other similar games.
You might be able to get some money for the game but I would guess that it is not going to be a quick seller.
I wish I could help you more.
What would the value on an item like this?
I am assuming that you are talking about this.
A quick look at Amazon and eBay turned up no copies for sale.
With no recent sales record I can only make an educated guess which may be high or low.
Lets start with the positives.
Now for the negatives.
Some people like to collect board games from certain publishers but I doubt there is anyone that is collecting games specifically made by Sears.
Second as you mentioned your copy is missing one of the balls.
This will affect the value.
Some collectors refuse to buy incomplete copies of games.
The big question about the game is whether anyone is actually looking for it.
Before reading your comment I had never heard of the game and there is very little information about the game on Board Game Geek.
I am guessing that people would be interested in the game if they knew about it but I wonder how many people are actually looking for it.
This is the key to the value of the game.
I am excited for the value of that amount as I purchased at estate sale.
Does anyone know where I can sell it and how much it is worth?
The only results I could find for Palladium involved a RPG and I am guessing that is not the game you are inquiring about.
Does the box give a specific date that it was created?
Is there any other information about the game on the box other than it being a mix of chess and checkers?
Without more information it is kind of hard to make an estimation about how much the game could be worth.
As far as where to sell the game your best guess would be to either list the game on eBay or if there is a local board game shop you may inquire if they purchase board games from customers.
I might need a little more information about your game.
Looking up Clobber on Board Game Geek returns five different games with that name.
I am guessing that your game is either the or the.
If it is not one of these two games can you give me any other information about the game?
I was unable to find either of these games on Amazon.
On eBay there have been a couple of both games listed over the last couple of months.
These copies were opened but complete.
Therefore I would say that these two games would probably not be worth a ton.
I would not consider it worthless though because people do prefer unopened copies of board games.
It is kind of hard to estimate a value though.
Unopened copies of games can sell for multiple times what an unopened copy does.
Of the two games I would guess that the Gabriel game would sell for more than the Waddingtons game.
I hope this helps.
Is it a rare edition?
Before reading your comment I had never heard of Monopoly Stock Exchange.
It turns out that this version of Monopoly is different than your normal Monopoly because players can buy shares in different properties which allows multiple people to own a share of the same property.
It also was designed by Reiner Knizia a well known board game designer and was apparently never officially released in the United States.
A value for the game is a little hard to pinpoint.
It has some value but it is not worth hundreds of dollars.
Amazon has two listings for it but there are no copies available under either listing: .
I hope this helps.
Honestly the only information I could really find for the game was by looking at the box.
First the game is pretty unknown since if it was more well known you should be able to find more about it online.
There are some positives for the game though.
First the game is sealed which always helps the value.
Second the game features an ex-NFL player.
While Larry Centers only played fullback in the NFL, there may be people who would collect things associated with him.
Third it appears that the game is uncommon or possibly rare with how little information there is about the game online.
The value of the game will be determined by how much interest there is in the game which is hard to judge with how little information there is about the game.
I wish I could give you a more definitive answer.
I hope this helped though.
I have an unopened 1991 pressman toy company The Adams Family card game.
I want to sell it.
Do you think there would be interest in it?
In my experience the stranger a game is the more likely it is to be worth money.
That is not always the case though.
I looked up your Addams Family card game and it seems to have a little value but not a ton.
If the game has a barcode you could make a listing for the game on Amazon.
It could take quite a while to sell on Amazon though.
I think the reason that the Addams Family card game 1991 version is not worth more is due to two things.
First the game is somewhat recent being made in the 1990s.
Also the game was made to capitalize on the 1991 movie which means that quite a few copies of the game were probably made.
I hope this helps.
There was a players club.
Is this of interest to collectors?
I am assuming you are talking about this.
I personally had never heard of the game but it actually sounds interesting.
It probably means that there is not a lot of interest in the game though so if you want to sell the game you will probably have to be really patient.
I hope this helps.
One is Campbell Kids Shopping Game.
I was wondering if this type of game would have any value.
I know there are some Campbell Soup collectors out there and just seeing tell what are some fun online games to play with friends recommend this type of game would sell and for what value.
I would guess at the very least that is is uncommon at this point.
The age 1955 should also help.
I would have two concerns with regards to value.
First the game was made by Parker Brothers which means that more copies of the game were probably made than most board games from the 1950s.
If the game was made by a smaller publisher possibly a company no longer in existence I would guess that the game would be more valuable since less copies would have been made.
This might not hurt the value that much though since collectors of Parker Brothers games may be interested in picking up the game for their collection.
Before bringing the game to my attention, I had never heard of it before.
Since the game was released quite a few years before I was born I obviously never played the game as a child.
People who have played the game before may have more interest in the game than I would though.
With how little information there is about the game online it is hard to judge the interest that there would be for the game.
If several people are looking for the game though the value could actually get pretty high if you were to put the game on eBay or a similar website and multiple people bid against one another.
As I already mentioned my value estimation is just an educated guess due to the little information I could find for the game.
If the game is quite rare though and multiple people are looking for the game I could see it going for a couple hundred dollars.
It will really come down to how much interest there is in the game though.
If you were planning on selling the game though you may have to be patient though since it might take a while to find someone interested enough in the game to pay what the game is worth.
I wish I could have been more helpful.
Do you know where I can find out of print game instructions?
Also, is there a site you recommend to get instructions from for any game?
Here on Geeky Hobbies I have reviewed around 400 different board games and I include a how to play section in every review.
Board Game Geek has a page for most board games except for some really niche games.
I looked up and it does have a Board Game Geek page.
If you leave a message on the forums for the game asking for instructions a user that owns the game may either give you a scan of the rules or could give you an overview of how to play the game.
It may take a little time though since only 16 people on the website own a copy of the game.
Games are:truth or consequences, michigan rummy, the wizard of oz, go the the head of the class, safely home, smess, finance, paydirt, san juan roulette, emergency, perfection,space tilt, tiddly winks and 13 dead end drive.
I will try to help you as much as I can.
For quite a few of the games I am going to need more information though since there have been many different versions of the game made over the years.
Paydirt has value but it is going to be hard to judge without knowing the year since the game was put out every year for quite a few years.
For Emergency I am assuming you are referring to.
As far as where to sell the games I have three recommendations.
If the game currently has a listing on Amazon, Amazon is probably the place where you are going to get the most for games.
The games have to have all of the pieces though to be sold on Amazon and it could take quite a while to find a buyer.
Your second option is eBay.
You should be able to sell the games quicker on eBay but you generally get less for board games on eBay than you would other places.
The third option I have would be.
Board Game Geek has a lot of board game collectors so you could try to find people who are interested in specific games.
I hope this helped.
Wondering if any are valuable.
Thanks for all the advice given on this web site!
Write me if any of the games pop out as valuable or rare.
After a quick look at your list here is my quick analysis.
The 1940s-1950s Monopoly is kind of hard to pinpoint since so many versions of the game was released during that period.
Condition will be a big determining factor.
Does the game have all of the other components that originally came with the game?
The main reason that Monopoly is not worth as much as you would probably expect is that Monopoly is probably the most popular board game of all time and thus millions of copies of the game have been made.
Most people would be fine with a new version of the game so I would guess that the older versions of the game will only appeal to collectors.
This is why condition is really important since collectors will likely be looking for the copies in the best condition.
Without anymore information that is about what I would estimate that it would be worth.
The rest of your games I have put in different price ranges.
These are just estimates and do fluctuate from time to time.
On average though this is about what I would expect you could get from the games.
All of these prices are based on copies that are complete and are in at least acceptable condition.
Honeymooners Game Sequence The following games I would need more information about because there are a lot of similar versions of the game that were created: Chess Teacher Wooden Maze I hope this was helpful.
My son wants to play it soooooooo bad and I want to keep it in the plastic in case it may be worth something someday.
I know these things would be difficult to predict, but in your expert opinion, do you think it will be worth something someday?
First does it say anywhere on the box how many copies of the game were made?
If there are no numbers printed on the box it usually means that the game was mass produced since companies usually like to promote that limited copies of the game were created.
If there were only a couple thousand copies of the game made I could see the value going up if there is future demand for the game.
Another question that I would have is whether this was a more expensive game from the start?
The game came out late last year so the current price probably still reflects the initial sale price of the game.
The final value of the game will be determined by how desired the game is by fans of the game.
It would probably take at least a couple years of the game being out of print before that would happen though.
If you were going to sell the game it would probably take some time to sell as well since most people would probably just buy one of the cheaper versions of the game.
I hope this was helpful.
A-26, looks like 1972 never opened and still wrapped in plastic.
While not worth a ton, Masterpiece has value.
Masterpiece in a game that was originally released in the 1970s where players bought and sold paintings in order to make money.
I have actually reviewed on Geeky Hobbies.
You will have to be patient though since it will probably take time to sell as you will have to wait for someone looking for a pristine copy.
Admirals is a little harder to estimate.
Admirals is a 1970s board game that is basically a naval version of the classic board game Stratego.
Currently Admirals is listed on Amazon but has no copies currently available for sale.
In general games on eBay sell for less than they do on Amazon.
This is just an estimate though.
I hope this helps.
Wondering if you knew a price for Hasbros 1973 The Batman Game?
If the game you are talking about isI found one copy of the game that sold on eBay a little over a month ago.
I would have to say that I was a little surprised that it sold for that little.
People are willing to spend more on something if they have a better idea of what they are getting.
Second with the game being sold on eBay it was unlikely to sell for as much as it could have since games tend to sell for less on eBay than other sites.
Finally I have a feeling that more copies of the game were made than I originally anticipated.
Companies like Hasbro seemed to start publishing larger quantities of board games in the 1970s and with a Batman license I am guessing that they made quite a few copies of the game.
These are just guesses though.
I hope this helps.
The other game is… Bunco by fundex games, ltd.
As far as value unfortunately neither game is really worth a lot.
I will preface this by saying that I am far from an expert on Monopoly.
As far as value Monopoly is one of the hardest board games to judge as there have been so many versions of the game released over the years.
Most versions of Monopoly are basically worthless but there are some versions that can be really valuable.
For older Monopolies usually the older it is the better.
Based solely on age the game has to be from the 1930s to have much value and not all 1930s versions are that valuable.
With so many copies in existence many old copies of Monopoly are not worth as much as you would expect as many copies still exist to this day.
Other than the really old versions of the game there are some very specific versions of the game that do have some value because they either had unique playing pieces or there is something unique about the components not present in any other versions of the game.
I know some of the sets created during wars that used non-metal playing pieces can have some value.
Does the game box or any of the components have a copyright date on them?
Seeing as I assume your version is quite old, the copyright date likely will be in Roman numerals.
That is mostly because there have been quite a few versions of Scrabble Junior made over the years.
To give you a more accurate picture about the value of the game I will need to know more information about your version of the game.
It would be helpful to know the publisher and the year of the game.
Just to get an idea I quickly looked up French versions of Scrabble on eBay.
I am guessing this is mostly due to there being quite a few copies of the French version of Scrabble out there.
The one good thing for the value of your game is that it is still sealed.
Games that are sealed are worth considerably more than opened copies.
If you have an old version of the game it could be worth a decent amount with it being sealed.
I hope this helps.
Wondering if you could tell me some information regarding the sale of them.
Any ideas or suggestions?
Also, all pieces of each are accounted for, and pristine condition.
In the game players would move around a gameboard trying to finish their objectives while a VHS tape played in the background.
If you want to learn more about the series check out our review of.
The Nightmare and Atmosphere series are a series of board games that have maintained some value.
What is kind of strange about the Nightmare series is that the later games in the series are worth more than the earlier games.
I think this is mostly because the earlier versions were probably reprinted and the series probably started losing popularity towards the end.
Board games have never sold as well on eBay as they do on Amazon.
This is partially due to sellers not being patient and trying to sell things as quickly as possible.
A lot of these valuable board games have a particular audience so it takes time to find the right buyer.
If you were interested in selling the games my recommendation would depend on how quickly you wanted to get rid of them.
If you want to sell them quickly you are probably better off selling them on eBay but you likely will get less for them.
If you are willing to wait longer though you could probably get quite a bit more for them on Amazon.
I want to warn you though that they might take quite a while to sell on Amazon.
Unless you get lucky and find someone who wants them right away you may have to wait months or possibly over a year to sell them.
With Halloween coming up soon though you may be able to sell them quicker and might be able to get more for them from either site since people might want to play them for Halloween.
I hope this helps.
I cannot find this anywhere.
The copyright date shows 1955.
Do the numbers on the boxes mean anything.
This one has a 4521 on the lower left corner of the top and the same number in the lower right hand corner of the actual board game.
Any suggestions how to find more information?
As far as the numbers I believe the numbers are the catalog number for the game.
A lot of older games used to have these numbers.
I am not exactly sure what they were used for but I am guessing they were used to help with orders.
It has a spelling error on one of the spaces Carliol Square.
Does this make it any more desirable.
With a lot of collectibles, misprints do seem to add to the value.
Usually items with misprints or other errors are destroyed before they are sold so they are rarer than a normal version of the same item.
As far as how desirable this version of Monopoly is, I think it would come down to if this was a common misprint or not.
As far as how many were misprinted I honestly have no idea.
I will admit that I am far from an expert on Monopoly values as I am not a Monopoly collector myself.
I could see Monopoly experts being interested in a misprinted copy though.
I think it will mostly come down to how much interest there is in that version of Monopoly.
I wish I could have been of more help.
I was wondering if anyone could point me in the right direction.
Its called Thar she Blows!
I could send picture and it has directions and all the pieces.
This game was my grandfathers game as a kid.
Thanks for any info!
I tried to do some research on Thar She Blows!
This is not that surprising for a are old games worth anything from 1939.
My best guess on how to get more information about the game would be to ask a question about the game on the forums of.
I recommend asking the question on Board Game Geek because there are a lot of board game collectors on the site and a lot of users know about more obscure games.
With how many users there are on the site you might be able to find someone that is more familiar with the game.
If you were interested in how valuable the game is, the best I can do is to make a guess.
I am guessing that Thar She Blows was never reprinted so it is probably pretty rare.
The only question about the game being unknown is whether anyone even knows about it or even cares about it.
To get a better idea if people would be interested in the game, I would need a little more information about the game.
Do you know what type of game it is?
Basically can you quickly explain what you do in the game?
It would also be helpful to know what type of theme it blackjack sites that are online and free with other players />For example is it a war game?
Certain collectors are looking for certain types of games so some games have more value just based on the theme.
The best way to gauge a price is to look at what other copies of the game have sold for.
I hope this helps.
If you have any more information I will gladly try to help you as much as I can.
I have a vintage unopened, still in plastic 1974 Grand Master Mind Game.
Could you tell me what the value possibly is for this game?
Just for those who are not familiar with the game I would like to give a little information about the game itself.
Most people are familiar with the board game Mastermind.
With Mastermind being such a hit, over ten different sequels have been made for the game.
One of these sequels is Grand Mastermind.
Due to the fact that there is actually a strategy to automatically win Mastermind, most of these sequels added additional challenge to the game to make it harder to solve.
In Grand Mastermind another element is added to the game which forces players to figure out the color and shape of four different elements.
As far as value Grand Mastermind is rarer than the original version of Mastermind since Grand Mastermind was never reprinted unlike the original game.
As far as value the game has some value.
As I have mentioned in the post eBay prices tend to be lower side for board games though.
I will point out though if you were planning on selling the game on Amazon you will have to be patient since the game could take months to over a year to sell.
I hope this was helpful.
I would say that Marvel Zingo Heroes has some value but I think it is probably artificially high at this point.
I hope this was helpful.
Not even that it exists.
Ebay and google yeild nothing.
Gabriel Sons and Company New York.
Hoping you may be able to shed some light.
I will give you more if needed.
Or pics too… Thanks in advance.
Could you please help.
The Fraggle Trap Game is a board game based on the television show Fraggle Rock.
The game appears to be a roll and move style game which was made for younger children.
The game was made by Falcon Games which is a UK based board game publisher.
If you were planning on selling the game in the UK I would estimate the value would be around that much.
If so the value of the game would probably go up quite a bit maybe two to four times as much as the copy that did sell since board game collectors generally like purchasing games that are still factory sealed.
As far as outside of the UK I think the valuation becomes a little more interesting.
Fraggle Rock is one of those shows that actually has quite a few fans which should drive demand for the game.
I am a little curious about how many copies of the game were made as I am not that familiar with Falcon Games.
Being a licensed product there probably were a decent amount of copies of the game produced but probably not as many copies as there would be if the game was produced in the United States.
In the United States we had our own Fraggle Rock game produced by Milton Bradley at around the same time as the Fraggle Trap game but the two games are totally different games.
Being a British game though I would guess Fraggle Trap would have more value as it would be quite a bit harder to find in the United States.
Selling board games internationally can be kind of a pain though.
Would love to know more specifics of the game and potential value.
For more information on the game I would recommend checking out the page as it has quite a bit of information about the game.
We also reviewed a similar game here on Geeky Hobbies called.
As far as value it is going to be kind of hard to judge.
There have been quite a few versions of the game created over the years.
There have even been some recent reprints of the game that have been made to look like the old versions of the game.
I think the value will mostly be reliant on how old the game truly is.
If the game is truly from the 1890s or the early 1900s I can see quite a bit of value as games that old are valuable due to the fact that not many of them are still in existence.
To get the most for the game though you would need to find a board game collector that is really interested in the age of the game.
The instruction sheet was copyright 1928 by Parker Brothers, Inc.
Can you tell me anything about this game?
Basically the game seems to be a collection of other board games Ludo, Auto Race, Checkers, and Backgammon.
Ludo, Checkers and Backgammon are games that are over a hundred years old and are at this point public domain so anyone can legally make their own copy so there are many versions of the games available.
The game does seem like a pretty generic spin and move game though.
If you are looking for a value I can only make a guess.
It is not that easy to find games from 1928.
What hurts the value is that it is basically a collection of games with three of them being in the public domain.
The one outlier is Auto Race which might not have ever been reprinted.
There were quite a few similar racing games made in the same time period though and their values tend to differ quite a bit.
How many copies of the game are still in existence due to how old it is?
Also see more interested are people in the Auto Race game?
Without any recent sales data I can only guess at the value.
Looked on Board Game Geek, Ebay and Amazon, no luck How can I know the value?
As far as value I can only take an educated guess.
There are some positive and negative things when it comes to the value.
First it is good that the game is unopened.
Some people are willing to pay quite a bit more for a game if it is still factory sealed since there is a guarantee that it will have all of the pieces and they will be in good shape.
The other potential benefit is that the game seems to have been made by a small publisher as I have never heard of Normatt Products.
On the other side though the thing that is working the most against the game is the fact that it is a trivia game.
There is a chance that might not be the case for Hit Record Trivia.
With the game being made in 1973 the audience for the game will be fans of music from that era that also like trivia games.
While there will probably be some people that are looking for that I would guess that the game will take quite a while to sell and might not sell for a lot.
I have the box with dice, pegs and tumblers, but no board.
I can send a photo.
The Game of India is a game that has been around for over 1,000 years so it is currently in the public domain which means anyone can produce their own version of the game.
This is one of the reasons why there have been so many different versions of the game produced over the years.
As far as value the game being in poor condition and missing the gameboard is not going to help.
If the game would have any real value if would be because of the age.
If the game is from the late 1800s or early 1900s the box and pieces may have some value to someone who collects old board games and is either missing the box or the pieces to the game.
In older games the copyright date is usually written in Roman numerals.
I hope this helped.
The parts remaining clearly identify it as the Parchisi variety.
What was most puzzling was no info on the maker, The Phillips Company.
Not losing sleep over it though.
I will toss it onto the web and see what happens.
I appreciate your comments!
Have a game that I could not find on amazon, ebay or board geek.
Rules booklet says made by Outwit Company box 2921 Los Angeles ca.
Can not find info on company.
Any help would be appreciated.
Do the rules for the game seem to be the same as this version of?
If the rules seem to be the same, I have the following theory about the game.
I am guessing your copy of the game was the first version of the game produced.
With the game being produced by the Outwit Company I am guessing that the game was self published as most games made by a company with the same name as the game itself are self published games.
The developer then either sent a copy of their game to Parker Brothers or someone at Parker Brothers discovered the game.
Parker Brothers then picked up the rights to publish the game which are the versions of the game you usually find.
The value is probably going to really depend on how many copies of the game were produced.
If the game were to have value the game would have had to be pretty rare and you would need to find someone that wants the original version of the game.
I wish I could have given you more information.
It seems more like the game of checkers, with slightly different rules and different shaped cloth game board.
Definitely, its a novelty and its interesting to speculate about it.
I certainly appreciate all your help and insight.
I am guessing that Portfolio was a generic version of Monopoly created to try and cash in on the popularity of Monopoly.
As far as value I can only give you a guess.
The fact that the game was produced to fit in a tube instead of a box probably means that the game was made by a smaller publisher.
This means that there probably were not that many copies of the game made but few people probably know about it.
If you are selling the game in the United States it could add to the value as the game would be harder to find in the United States.
I more info the thing working against the game the most is the fact that it is a Monopoly clone game.
These type of games are usually not that much in demand as most people have their own version of Monopoly already.
As far as how to price the game this is a total guess.
You could always relist the game though and gradually lower the price until it sells.
I wish I could give you a better estimate but without being able to find any information about the game all I can do is guess about the value.
So mint mint condition.
Never opened, never played.
Never touched by human hands at all.
There are good things and bad things as it comes to the value of your Clue game.
There have been many different versions of Clue created over the years.
The game is also still made to this day so you can pick up a new copy of the game for cheap at almost any store.
The good news is that your copy of the game is still sealed.
Sealed copies of older games do maintain some value.
Unfortunately I am going to need more information about the game before I could make an estimation about whether the game has value.
Can you find the copyright date for the game?
If the game is an older version of Scrabble the copyright date will likely be in roman numerals.
It would also help to know if your Scrabble is a special edition or if it is just a normal version of Scrabble.
Generally speaking normal versions of Scrabble are not worth that much.
This is due to the game being popular and having been made for many years.
If a person is just looking for a copy of Scrabble they can easily find a cheap version of the game which means casual Scrabble players will not be the target audience if the game were valuable.
For the game to be valuable there would have to be something special about it that would appeal to fans and collectors of Scrabble.
If the game is one of the first sets made it may maintain some value.
Otherwise the game could have some value if there is something unique about your particular version of the game.
I wish I could have been more helpful.
On Board Game Geek I was only able to find one Wells Fargo game.
For those of you who are curious this Wells Fargo game has players retrieving stolen items and returning them for the reward money.
While the name is different, it seems like the game was also published under the name Wells Fargo Game as well.
I actually think your game may just be the Australian version of the game.
I say this because John Sands was responsible for printing a lot of Milton Bradley games publisher of Tales of Wells Fargo in Australia.
As far as Tales of Wells Fargo, the United States version of the game seems to be semi-valuable.
As far as the Australian version of the game I would guess the game would be around the same value.
If your game is different than the game I linked to you will probably have are online blackjack games rigged give me some additional information since that is the only Wells Fargo board game that I was able to find.
If you can give me more information I will try to help you as much as I can.
It is a game called sssScat by Cadaco, Inc.
The price is still on the box.
Any information would be appreciated.
The game is not even listed on Board Game Geek which is strange since most board games except for games made by small publishers are on the site.
Basically the only thing I could find about the game is a couple of pictures.
If you had the game would you hold onto it or what would you do with it?
It is not in great shape, the box is pretty beaten but it seems complete.
I have no idea if anyone would be willing to buy it specially because it is in Spanish.
Can you help me out with this one?
On the positive side the game appears to be an older war game.
There are people that collect older war games and thus they can sell for quite a bit of money.
When you factor in that the game is in Spanish and is about South American battles specifically Chilean battles I would guess that the game was printed in South America most likely in Chile.
If this was the case it likely had an even more limited print run than a similar game that was produced in the United States.
With all these factors added together I would guess that the game might be pretty rare.
The second issue is that the game actually has a print and play version up on Board Game Geek.
Instead of buying an original copy of the game some people may prefer to just print out this version of the game.
I think quite a few of the people that would be interested in the game though would like the original version of the game.
I think the more important thing about the condition is whether the game has all of the components.
In these type of war games they are usually missing some of the little soldier pieces.
As a lot of copies lose pieces over time, a complete copy of the game will have quite a bit more value.
If possible I would recommend comparing what pieces you have with the pictures on the Board Game Geek page as they seem to picture all of the components that originally came with the game.
This is going to be hard to judge especially since I am not a huge war game fan myself.
It probably depends on how many people are interested in Chilean history.
I would think that there would eventually be someone that would be interested in the game but it might take quite a while to find a person that would pay a fair price for the game.
These value estimates are just guesses though as it is ultimately going to come down if there are people that really want the game.
I hope this was helpful.
From the 60s or 70s I guess.
What do you think?
It is a game made by a designer that clearly was not a fan of Nixon as the game revolves around one player playing as Nixon and the other players trying to beat him.
It sounds a lot like a Monopoly style game with a few tweaks.
For more information about the game check out its.
I did some research and found some copies of the game for sale on Amazon.
I have to say click I am a little surprised that the game is not worth more than it is.
I find only one or two listings for it on both Amazon and Board Game Geek and they all appear to be the same seller since they all show the same slightly crushed box.
Price seems very high.
It is in great condition, possibly never used.
The game was published in 1992.
Can you recommend anyone knowledgeable?
If you give me the name of the board game I would be willing to look into it.
I can find nothing anywhere.
It is very strange.
In my opinion I would guess that the issue with your game is probably a limited issue with the game.
When the board was being printed I am guessing there was some issue with the printer or it was smeared in some way during the process.
In my experience with other games that have blurred printing it is generally a limited problem that only affects a small number of copies of the game.
With misprints I think people are usually looking for typos, or other printing errors.
I could be wrong though as there might be Monopoly collectors that try to acquire as many misprinted games as possible.
Usually there is a are old games worth anything to contact the company at the end of the instructions or there should be information on their website.
The game sold 80,000 copies.
I have the original and certified copy member 1 along with some memorabilia including a copy of the TV commercial.
So you know of a specialist collector or auctioneer that might be interested please?
You could always list it on eBay but you may need to be patient as you wait for the right person to find your listing in order to get the most for it.
If you were to sell the item I would definitely detail these parts of the game as they should make the item sell for more.
I can not find it on Ebay or Amazon and was wondering where I can find a copy.
To me it would seem like there are no copies left or they are in private collections.
If you live in Europe I would assume the game would be easier to find as the game was only made in Britain which is not surprising as the game is about British politics.
If you live in the United States or outside of Europe I think the game will be quite a bit harder to find as most copies of the game are probably in Europe so shipping the game overseas will add quite a bit to the cost.
As far as where to purchase the game, at this time it looks like it is going to be hard to find.
There is an for the item but there are currently none for sale.
There are a couple of people on that have the game available for trade so you could maybe talk with them and see what they are willing to sell it for.
Otherwise I would keep monitoring the Amazon page as someone might eventually put the game up for sale.
I read recently on Google that if the item has a manufactured default it is worth more.
My game has different publish dates than the directions.
The directions are the right ones for the game.
The Monopoly games that are worth more are usually ones where the words are misspelled, the game has the wrong colors or other similar more noticeable errors.
I have a feeling that the discrepancy between the gameboard and the instructions can be attributed to one of two things.
If you bought the game used it could be due to a previous owner just mixing the board from one copy with the rules from another copy.
I think the more likely explanation is due to how older board games were created.
I have seen Monopoly and other games that have been reprinted several times having instructions dated significantly older than the rest of the game.
I hope this was helpful.
I was surprised to find out that the game the one made by Waffle House is worth more than I was expecting.
I am guessing this is mostly because the game was made by Waffle House.
These copies were used as well so your copy should be worth more.
Generally sealed copies tend to sell for around twice as much as an unsealed copy.
You might have to be patient though as you have to find someone who is interested in the game to get maximum value.
I am hoping someone can answer a question for me, I picked up a Cranium game in brand new condition at a thrift shop and when I looked it up I could only find a few for sale.
Its the Canadian edition 2.
I am wondering if this is really what I could sell it for?
I think this is the case because the American versions of Cranium are generally not worth that much.
What I am guessing is that there were other copies of the game for sale that sold.
After those copies sold there were no other copies left except for the overpriced copy.
How rare is this game, and is it worth anything?
I would say that the game is at least uncommon and may be rare.
I did find a copy that recently sold on eBay though.
I would guess you could sell it for that much if you wanted to sell it on eBay.
With it being more of an unknown game though I would caution you that it might take a while to sell the game for that price.
There is a good chance that you may have to list it a couple times before it actually sells.
I think it would eventually sell though.
I hope this helped.
I am guessing you are talking about this version of?
As far as value the best I can give you is an educated guess.
There are no listings on Amazon, eBay, or even Board Game Geek.
On the positive side the game actually appears to be pretty rare.
In addition to the game probably being rare, it is one of those niche games that tend to be valuable.
Games based on real events that also include some interesting mechanics generally sell for more than games that are like many other games.
On the other hand the game is old enough that it has been out of print for a long time.
This likely means that not a lot of copies are still around today.
The game sounds like a roll and move game with a twist.
Games that are highly rated are more likely to sell as people want to play them as well as collect them.
Games with lower ratings still sell but they are sold more for their collectibility than actually wanting to play them.
The other factor potentially working against the game is the fact that the game appears to be pretty obscure.
A lot of people have probably never heard of the game before and thus it will be hard to find a market for the game.
It does not mean that there is not a market but if you plan on selling the game you might have to be patient as it likely will take some time.
The ultimate value is going to come down to finding someone who is interested in the game.
This might take some time so you might have to be patient if you are planning on selling it.
I have tried to research with no luck.
I can not find this game anywhere.
Singer1890New YorkUSA.
Under the name it reads.
Thank you for any help you can give me.
After some research I did find its page.
First of all does the game have the outer box and all of the components?
Is the game in good shape for its age?
The game will still have value if it is not in great shape but it will be worth even more if it is in good shape due to its age.
I think there are quite a few positives for the game and one potential issue.
Games made before 1900 generally have quite a bit of value as they are some of the oldest board games still in existence.
Another positive is that the game seems to have never been reprinted.
There are definitely people interested in board games from the 1800s.
The book apparently has photocopies of all of the boards, pieces and rules for all of the games featured.
Therefore if someone wanted to play the game they could just get the book.
This will drive away people that are only interested in playing the game.
There should still be people interested in purchasing the game as a collectible though.
I know board games from the 1800s that are in good shape can go for hundreds to even thousands of dollars.
As long as the game is not in terrible shape though, I would expect it to be quite valuable.
I have tried looking the game up itself and came up short and I tried getting some history on the company and no luck either.
I am guessing is not the game you are talking about as this is the only game I could find on Board Game Geek that even came close to your description.
Based on my experience, I would guess that your game was made by a small local publisher as I have never heard of Toys and Games of Nevada before.
I am guessing it was a game that was created to be sold as a souvenir for people visiting Las Vegas.
Most states seem to have these type of games that are made by local publisher that try to cash in on local attractions.
Based on what these type of games are normally like, I would guess that it is either a Monopoly style game or a trivia game about Las Vegas.
This is due to a couple factors.
The one positive for your game though is that it is based on Las Vegas.
There might not be a lot of people interested in the game itself but there are quite a few people interested in Las Vegas.
With the game featuring casinos that are no longer available, that should add to its value for Las Vegas collectors.
I would guess that people who collect Las Vegas items would be interested in the game.
It is in a black case and I have never heard of it.
I looked it up online and see some versions of it but they seem to be a different model.
Can you tell me more about it?
Is it worth anything?
I would love to learn more about it and if it has any value.
Looking at Board Game Geek I found this.
Here are the different of the game.
Is your game one of the versions shown?
The game I linked to is a board game similar to Monopoly that involves purchasing and selling oil.
The first page I linked to has a list of what originally came with the game if you wanted to check if your game has all of the original components.
I hope this helped.
My version is different.
Is the gameplay similar to what is outlined on the page I linked to a Monopoly style game?
If it is a special edition it should add some value to the game.
How much it adds will come down to how much someone is looking for the game.
Never been played, cardboard bits almost all still unpunched.
Still has the old order forms etc.
Box is in excellent condition too.
I feel like this would be worth something but hard to know where to start!
Any ideas if this is valuable?
First of all, yes the crayons are used in the game.
Basically in the game you run a railroad company that is trying to build a train network to make the most money.
The crayons are used to draw on the map to indicate which track lines you own.
As far as value I would put the game in the valuable but not super valuable range.
Empire Builder is actually a pretty popular board game that inspired a whole line of train board games.
On the positive side there is going to be a market for the game.
Especially with the game being the first edition and being unplayed, there will be people interested in buying the game.
On the negative side the game has been reprinted at least seven different times throughout the years.
There will be people interested in the first edition, but the additional versions will probably drop the phrase what are the best slot machines to play and win sorry some.
I hope this helped.
Amazon, eBay, game board geeks.
The only information I could find about it was that they generally make versions of public domain games like Chess, Checkers, and Backgammon.
As it is a public domain game no one own the rights to the game so anyone can make and sell their own setmost sets of Backgammon are not worth much money.
At the same time though there are a lot of Backgammon fans.
People who are really into Backgammon are willing to spend money on high quality sets.
The value of your set is going to depend on the component quality and the age.
If the set is well made and was expensive when it was first made, it will probably still have value.
Also if the set is really old 100+ years old I could see it having some value.
It is in good condition and appears to have all the pieces.
It was released in 1986.
I found information on Board Game Geek, but did not find any pricing information.
Is this game worth that much or is that the seller just picking their own price?
Before your comment I had never heard of Stealth before.
After some brief research the game actually looks pretty interesting as it combines a sci-fi theme with an abstract game.
One comment even mentioned that the game is rare.
The game has all the makings of a game that could be worth that much or even more.
The actual price is going to come down to the demand for the game though.
For these type of games that most people have never heard of, the price comes down to if someone is looking for the game.
The game seems rare enough and has all of the things I look for when estimating whether a game will be valuable.
If someone is looking for the game I would guess they would be willing to pay around the price of the eBay listing.
I am not familiar enough with the game to know whether there is a real demand for it.
One thing I know for sure though is that you likely will have to be patient if you ultimately end up choosing to sell the game.
I hope this was helpful.
Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published.
Notify me of new posts by email.
To support the blog and keep it free for all users, Geeky Hobbies utilizes various affiliate programs to earn commissions.
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.
We are also members of the eBay Partner Network.

T7766547
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

You may not realize it, but those old VHS tapes you probably have stored away could be potentially worth thousands. Stay in the loop! Get breaking news and big stories on your desktop.


Enjoy!
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Valid for casinos
The best classic PC games still worth playing | PCWorld
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
People visible, game where you are a dragon pc 2019 question a lot of things.
From sports collectibles, to books and antiques; there are collectors for everything.
Board games are no exception.
There are a lot of people that collect board games, myself included since I own hundreds of board games.
With collectors comes value so as board games have become more popular, the prices for rare board games have risen quite a bit lately.
While most board games are worth very little, there are plenty of board games worth hundreds to thousands of dollars.
Being a collector of board games for quite a few years, I have run into a lot of board games.
I have learned quite a bit about board game values from my years collecting them and this post is going to outline what I have learned.
These are only tips as there are games that will defy these tips.
Condition is not going to make a worthless game valuable but it is big in determining the value of a rare game.
A rare game in good condition can sell for multiple times more than the same game that is in poor condition.
A game that has never been played before is guaranteed to have all of the components which is key for a lot of rare games since it is hard to find parts for these games.
It can be a hassle to find the missing parts for a game and collectors will pay a premium for not having to find the pieces that a game is missing.
Sealed games are also more likely to have boxes in good to great condition which is really important to some collectors.
It is really hard to find rare games in an unopened condition.
Condition is still key even if the game is opened.
The most important thing is that the game has all of the pieces.
A game that is missing non important pieces like dice or playing pieces are less likely to be affected as games that are missing key components.
Missing even one piece, even a minor one, drops the value of most games by a significant amount but the games still have some value.
Some collectors will buy incomplete games hoping to get the missing parts from other people.
Game pieces for rare games can also sell for a lot of money especially if it is a game that is regularly missing pieces.
If you find a rare game that has a lot of the pieces but not all of them you can make quite a bit of money selling the pieces off individually to people that are just missing a couple pieces from their copy of the game.
Just having all of the pieces is not enough for some collectors though.
The condition of the contents is important as well.
If a person is paying a lot for a game they are looking for a game in good condition.
Creases in cards or the board, broken pieces, and other imperfections in the components will affect the value of the game.
The quality of the box in particular is really important since a lot of people like displaying their rare games so a good box is important.
Being Old Does Not Necessarily Make A Game Valuable The first thing people think makes a game valuable is age.
If a game is old it must be valuable right?
In the world of board games that is true to a point.
Being old rarely if ever decreases the potential value of a game.
If you can find a board game from the early 1900s 1930s or earlier or even the 1800s it is likely to be worth money.
A lot of board games from the late 1800s and early 1900s were made of paper and wood.
Through the years many of the games from this era have been destroyed, damaged, lost pieces, or thrown away.
Most of the copies still in existence are already in the hands of a collector.
If you can find one though it will likely be worth a lot of money.
There are some exceptions though with a big one being the game Monopoly.
You might own a really old copy of Monopoly from the 1930s or 1940s and think it must be worth a lot of money.
Unfortunately old Monopolies are not worth nearly as much as you would expect.
The main reason is that so many copies of the game were made that despite being really old, many of the older copies of the game are still in existence.
The only old Monopolies that are actually worth a lot of money are the first copies made.
The odds of you finding really old board games is not particularly high so what about more recent games.
In most cases if the game is newer than the 1960s or 1970s, the age is not really going to affect the value.
There are a lot of valuable games made after the 1960s but they are usually valuable for one of the other reasons listed below.
Has the Average Person Heard Of It One of the first things you should ask yourself about a game is if the average person has heard of the game.
If you asked random people on the street if they know a particular game and half or more of them have heard of it, it is unlikely to be worth anything.
Your copy of Monopoly, Scrabble, Trivial Pursuit, Sorry, etc are not going to be worth anything.
With so many games made, anyone who wants the game can find a copy for cheap.
If no one wants a game because it is bad or everyone who wants the game already has a copy, the game will have no value.
Hundreds to thousands of games are made every year so there are a bunch of games that no one has heard of before.
The themes that do best for older board games can be the opposite for new games are movies, television shows, cartoons, singers, sports stars and anything else from pop culture.
Games about wars and other specific events can also be sought after by collectors.
The reason these games are valuable is that there are multiple types of collectors interested in the item.
In the future more recent games may go up in value based on their theme as people become more nostalgic for the theme.
Some publishers are well known for creating fun games or games with great components which drives up the prices of their games.
Milton Bradley, Hasbro, and Parker Brothers games in particular are rarely worth anything unless they are quite old.
If you find a game from any of these companies that was made prior to 1940 though they could be worth money except for Monopoly.
Most really old board games are worth money especially if they were made by companies that no longer exist.
Games made by the in particular are worth quite a bit of money.
They were actually one of Parker Brothers biggest rivals until Parker Brothers bought them out in 1920.
A lot of these old board game companies went out of business a long time ago many during the Great Depression.
Since a lot of these really old games are already owned by collectors, there are more modern game publishers that have made a lot of valuable board games.
One company in particular is Avalon Hill.
Avalon Hill is still around even though they are currently a subsidiary of Hasbro.
Before joining Hasbro, Avalon Hill was well known for their war games and detailed strategy games.
A lot of their games were never massively produced because a lot of their titles are gauged towards specific audiences.
Their fans love their games though so some collectors are willing to pay quite a bit of money for them.
Most Avalon Hill games come with a lot of cardboard components though so they can be missing pieces.
Their main line of games were the bookshelf game series which featured board games the size of books that you could fit on your shelf.
TSR is another board game publisher that has made a lot of valuable board games.
TSR mostly made tabletop RPGs like the original Dungeons and Dragons.
Desirable Genres Some board game genres tend to be more valuable than others.
One genre in particular that creates a lot of valuable games is the war game.
War games are one of the oldest genres and have a dedicated fan base.
The more detailed the game is number of components can be a good indicator of value as well.
Avalon Hill is probably the biggest and most well known war game publisher.
Miniature games are also generally quite expensive.
Miniature games are games that use a bunch of little figures for gameplay.
An example is Warhammer 40K.
The figures generally feature a lot of detail which means they cost a lot when they were originally sold and usually hold their value over time.
Tabletop RPGs can also be quite valuable especially if they are more obscure and had only one printing.
TSR RPGs in particular can be worth quite a bit of money.
Special editions of board games usually include higher quality components which lead to higher prices.
A lot of collectors are looking for the special editions of their favorite games because they want the higher quality components.
Some special editions originally sold for hundreds to thousands of dollars.
These special editions can be worth a lot more than they originally sold for because many times there is more demand than supply.
Two ways to tell how much a game originally cost is to look at the quantity and quality of the components.
Quantity is a good way to indicate the original cost of a lot of games.
If the game comes with a lot of components outside of cards it was probably pretty expensive when it was originally made.
Games that include a lot of figures in particular are usually expensive and usually retain their value if all of the pieces are included.
Quality is also a sign of the original cost.
Obviously the special editions made with expensive materials like gold or jewels are going to be valuable just based on the materials used.
Quality is also shown in the detail put into figures and other game components.
If the game has a lot of custom components and it looks like a lot of time was spent creating the components, the game was probably pretty expensive.
The Forgotten Gems For every Monopoly, Trivial Pursuit, Scrabble, etc.
These games never became popular enough to be re-released.
Even if the games never became popular, these games do have their fans.
People remember playing these games and are longing to play them again or they just heard about them and want to try them out.
Since these games are rare due to their limited popularity, people are willing to pay quite a bit of money for them.
Most games from the 1970s to mid 1990s are generally worth very little.
A lot of these games were mass produced and the games that were popular have been reproduced many times over.
This time range is ripe for these forgotten are old games worth anything though.
A lot of these games bombed and were never made again.
People enjoyed some of these games though and are willing to pay more than you would expect to relive childhood memories.
Some examples of forgotten gems include Fireball Island and Dark Tower.
Both of these games were made by Milton Bradley in the 1980s.
The reason these games are valuable is because a lot of people really like these games despite not being very popular when they first came out.
Players have lost their copies of the games over the years or people have just recently heard about the games and want their own copy of the game which drives demand for the games.
A lot of people purchase these games because they want to play a game that they missed out on when it was first released.
These cult games can really grow an audience which drives up the price.
These are the valuable board games you are most likely to find because it includes more recent games which are much easier to find since more copies were produced and they are newer so more copies are still in existence.
Adult games are usually a better bet to be valuable.
I think the main reason is that they are more enjoyable for collectors to actually play.
While some collectors might be fine with just putting the game on the shelf, most people want to play their games.
This usually leads to more valuable games.
Generally this applies more to older games than newer games since companies are starting to make games based on stranger themes as the hobby continues to grow.
Stunning Artwork Some collectors buy board games to be able to play them while other collectors buy board games for display purposes.
Just like some people collect records for their cover art, the same applies to board games.
Collectors who are interested in artwork want colorful and interesting artwork.
best android games racing the are what box with generic artwork is not going to be that interesting to collectors.
If yes the game could hold some advise are slot machines legal in north carolina join if some of the other factors are true as well age is pretty important for box artwork.
In addition to the boxes, collectors are also interested in games with really colorful and interesting gameboards.
People like to display gameboards that have really nice artwork.
Desirable Designers Just like people have their favorite directors, a lot of people have favorite board game designers.
These people will buy almost every game made by the designer.
This means that every game made by that designer has demand.
Most well known designers have some valuable games but most of their games are not that expensive.
The designers whose whole collection is valuable are those designers that make high quality games in limited runs.
This means their games can get quite expensive.
The Game Is Actually Good While pretty obvious, if a game is good it is likely to be worth more.
Who wants to buy a bad game?
Most good games are actually pretty cheap because they are mass produced to meet demand.
These games regularly get reproduced in order to capitalize on their popularity which drives down prices.
A good place to check whether a board game is good is.
Where to Check Board Game Values and Sell Them So you think you have a valuable board game?
You now have to do your research.
Checking sites like can give you an indication of whether a game is rare.
The best way to know if a board game is valuable though is to just look it up.
The two main places to buy and sell board games are Amazon and eBay.
Of the two I personally prefer selling games on Amazon.
I prefer Amazon for one simple reason, you can usually get more for a game on Amazon than you can on eBay.
You might incur a lot of listing fees relisting an item on eBay over and over again waiting for the right person to find the item.
Amazon and Amazon buyers are a lot pickier than eBay though.
If your game is in poor condition, you might not want to sell it on Amazon.
If the game is missing pieces I would highly recommend selling it somewhere else.
To sell on Amazon you need to read the selling guidelines closely and follow them or Amazon can revoke your selling privileges quickly.
Be sure to be thorough in your description of the item though because collectors expect the item to arrive in a condition similar to that of which you described.
If the game is not in high demand though you might have to pay listing fees every time you relist the item.
The third place I would look to sell a game is on Board Game Geek.
Board Game Geek has a marketplace where people can list games for sale.
The good thing about Board Game Geek is that it could be much easier to find someone who wants your game since Board Game Geek caters to board game fans.
Items in the marketplace are displayed on the page for the game that you are selling so anyone who is interested in that game will see your listing.
Your Thoughts Do you currently own any valuable board games?
What games do or did you own?
Am I missing any tips on spotting valuable board games?
Share your thoughts in the comments section.
June 29, 2016 at 10:03 am hi there, recently got some old board games and was wondering if they are worth much or not???
The first thing I would do would be to check if the games are on Amazon or eBay.
If they are on either site that should give you a pretty good idea of whether the games are valuable.
If you can find results on eBay I would recommend looking at the completed listings there is a spot on the left sidebar that lets you sort results since completed listings actually shows what an item sold for.
If the games are not on either Amazon or eBay, a good source would probably be BoardGameGeek.
BoardGameGeek is a great website to find out about more obscure board games.
Interest in the game is probably going to depend on factors such as the theme of the game, condition, and the other things I mention in the post.
I hope this helps you.
If so maybe you can answer a question.
Were games like the 1938 parker bros Lone ranger ever sold without the Box.
In other words the board and the pieces sold separately but not coming in the blue box.
Looking at Board Game Geek I think I found the game you are talking about.
The main version of the game did seem to come with a full sized box.
This version has the board and a smaller box that holds the components.
Is this the version you are talking about?
I actually think Parker Brothers did this with quite a few of their other older board games.
I wonder if this was like how today there are normal and deluxe versions.
If this was the case I am guessing the version without the outer box was the cheaper version of the game.
This was well before my time though so it is just an educated guess.
I have been unable to find these anywhere to check on their value.
Can you help me please?
Based on some quick research I think one of the games could be worth a moderate amount while the other unfortunately is not going to be worth much.
If your Dallas in the Box is thisit unfortunately is not worth much.
Being a big Green Bay Packers fan I actually own a copy of the game which I hope to play soon and post a review on this site.
As far as value it tends to fluctuate a little on eBay and it is not listed on Amazon.
I think that is a little on the low side because it is currently the offseason and the game should sell for more during the football season and will probably sell for themost around November to early December since you will then get Packer fans wanting to buy the game for a Christmas gift.
Condition is going to matter quite a bit though.
Does the game have all of the contents?
What does the box look like split corners, stains, creases, tears, marks, etc.
Condition is going to be important since Packer fans who want to buy the game as a collectible will likely want to display it in their homes so if the box is in good condition it will likely sell for more.
If you were thinking about selling the game I would suggest waiting until at least the start of football season and I would probably recommend waiting until closer to November due to Christmas shopping.
If you wanted to sell it I think the best options would be either or.
Taking good pictures and describing the condition of the game the best you can should help make the game sell for more.
I hope this helps.
It is in good condition and I would to know if its worth anything.
Please send me your email address so I can show you pictures of the boardgame.
I am assuming that you are talking about.
The New Game of Human Life was originally made in 1790 but was apparently reprinted at least a couple times throughout the years.
The true value of the game comes down to if it was an original printing or one of the earlier reprints.
If it is the original printing or one of the first re-prints I would guess the game could be worth hundreds to thousands of dollars.
If the game is not that old though I think it could still have some value as long as it is not a recent reprint less than 50 years old.
I wish you luck in finding out more about your game.
Usually special editions of board games can be worth quite a bit of money.
World of Warcraft is also still pretty popular so that should make the game more valuable.
Also does the package say when the game was made?
Looking at I found two different types of World of Warcraft Mahjong sets.
There were also a couple 2015 sets from Blizzcon.
I hope this helps.
Battling Tops has some value.
This is typical since most board games sell for more on Amazon than eBay.
It probably will sell for more as we get closer to Halloween though.
Of the three Kerplunk is probably worth the least.
Being the most well known game, it had more copies made and there have been several reprints of the game throughout the years.
This reduces the value of the game since unless a person wants a specific version of the game you can find a cheaper new version of the game.
I hope this helps.
Personally I never heard of the board game Secret Code.
I am assuming this is an older game?
If it is an older game the copyright date may be in Roman numerals.
Looking up the game on Board Game Geek I found three results for Secret Code.
The other game I found was.
Apparently one of the names that Mastermind has used in the past is Secret Code.
It is not that uncommon for board games to go under different names in different countries.
I also looked up Hamleys on Board Game Geek and only found a couple games and none match Secret Code.
I am guessing that your game is not in the Board Game Geek catalog.
If your game is not a version of Mastermind can you send me some more information like the year or simple explanation of how the game is played and I will try to get you some more information about the game.
Due to this fact there have been a lot of different Charades games made throughout the years.
With all of these different versions of the game, none of the versions of Charades seem to be worth much.
I hope this helps with your decision of whether to open the game.
There are a couple of marks on the box and a small crease to the right side of the midline join on the board but it still lies flat when opened.
Is this a game that is sought after?
Any information you may have would be much appreciated.
Thank you in advance.
Thank you for the question.
Kingmaker is a 1974 war game about the War of the Roses which took place in 1400s England.
While Ariel made the original version of the game in 1974, two years later it was picked up by Avalon Hill who was well known for making war games.
Kingmaker has a lot of the things that you are looking for in a valuable board game.
These types of games were pretty niche since not a lot of people want to play a game about war in 1400s See more />The game was also picked up by Avalon Hill which means that it is a pretty well regarded game.
The game is actually well received by the board game community as evidenced by.
The game also has not had a recent reprint since the latest version of the game was released in 1988.
Your copy having all of the pieces is also important since these older war games came with a lot of small pieces which are really easy to lose so it is hard to find a complete copy.
Looking at Amazon I found a couple versions of the game for sale.
There are a couple catches though.
This means that if you want to sell the game you will have to sell it onor somewhere else.
This is actually pretty typical of eBay since board games never sell for as much on eBay as they do on Amazon.
Board Game Geek usually has a pretty good grasp on how much a game is worth since the site is for board game enthusiasts so they generally have a good idea of what the game is worth.
So the value of are electronic slot machines rigged game will probably depend on where you would sell it.
I will warn you ahead of time that it could take over a year to sell on Amazon.
A positive in your case is that the game has all of the pieces.
The wear on the box and the small crease on the board may slightly affect the value but you are going to have those issues with any game from the 1970s that has been opened.
I hope this helps.
I have never heard of the the puzzle game Hitler Vs Enemy before.
To make an educated guess though I would need some more information.
You list it as a puzzle game.
Is it mostly just a puzzle or is it more of a game?
In general I would say that a game would be worth more than a puzzle but there are puzzles that can be worth quite a bit if they are old and are of a subject that people are interested in which based on the title your puzzle game would probably fit since a lot of people are interested in World War 2.
Is there a copyright date printed on the box?
If it is from the 1930s-1950s it could be worth a lot especially considering the topic.
There are also a lot of collectors of World War 2 memorabilia so World War 2 and board game collectors could be interested in the game.
If it is actually from the 1930s-1950s and is more of a game than a puzzle it could be worth hundreds to thousands if it is a rare game that people are actually interested in.
This is just a guess though since I could find no information about it online.
If it is more recent it could still be worth money but it is less likely to be worth a lot.
If the game was made before the 1990s it could have some value because based on the title it sounds like it might be a war game which usually had low print runs and there are collectors who really like war games.
A more recent game would have to be rare or was expensive to begin with to be worth a lot of money.
If the game looks like it would have cost quite a bit when it was first sold it could still retain some of that value.
One final thing that will matter is the condition of the game.
If the game has all of the pieces and they are in decent shape that is a positive.
If the game is missing pieces though or the pieces are in bad shape that will hurt the value.
Without being able to find anything about the game online it is kind of hard to judge the value of the game.
If you can provide me some more information about what type of game it is, the year it was made, or any other information from the box that might be helpful I could maybe give you a better answer.
Like, there are no copies I could find on either Amazon or E-bay, so I have no idea.
Before you brought the game to my attention, I had never heard of the game.
Generally the best area to find information about a board game is which you already looked at.
The game only has one version of the game on Board Game Geek so either no one has updated the page to indicate another printing run or there was only 500 copies of the game ever made.
Being made by a small company there is a good chance that there never was a second printing of the game.
On eBay I did find one copy of the game which was sold from the United Kingdom.
I think the game could be worth more than that copy sold for though.
The game probably sat for a while and the seller just wanted to get rid of it so they sold it really cheap.
The question is whether anyone is actually looking for the game.
Without much of a sales history for the game and little information on the game in general I am just making an educated guess based on the value of other similar games.
You might be able to get some money for the game but I would guess that it is not going to be a quick seller.
I wish I could help you more.
What would the value on an item like this?
I am assuming that you are talking about this.
A quick look at Amazon and eBay turned up no copies for sale.
With no recent sales record I can only make an educated guess which may be high or low.
Lets start with the positives.
Now for the negatives.
Some people like to collect board games from certain publishers but I doubt there is anyone that is collecting games specifically made by Sears.
Second as you mentioned your copy is missing one of the balls.
This will affect the value.
Some collectors refuse to buy incomplete copies of games.
The big question about the game is whether anyone is actually looking for it.
Before reading your comment I had never heard of the game and there is very little information about the game on Board Game Geek.
I am guessing that people would be interested in the game if they knew about it but I wonder how many people are actually looking for it.
This is the key to the value of the game.
I am excited for the value of that amount as I purchased at estate sale.
Does anyone know where I can sell it and how much it is worth?
The only results I could find for Palladium involved a RPG and I am guessing that is not the game you are inquiring about.
Does the box give a specific date that it was created?
Is there any other information about the game on the box other than it being a mix of chess and checkers?
Without more information it is kind of hard to make an estimation about how much the game could be worth.
As far as where to sell the game your best guess would be to either list the game on eBay or if there is a local board game shop you may inquire if they purchase board games from customers.
I might need a little more information about your game.
Looking up Clobber on Board Game Geek returns five different games with that name.
I am guessing that your game is either the or the.
If it is not one of these two games can you give me any other information about the game?
I was unable to find either of these games on Amazon.
On eBay there have been a couple of both games listed over the last couple of months.
These copies were opened but complete.
Therefore I would say that these two games would probably not be worth a ton.
I would not consider it worthless though because people do prefer unopened copies of board games.
It is kind of hard to estimate a value though.
Unopened copies of games can sell for multiple times what an unopened copy does.
Of the two games I would guess that the Gabriel game would sell for more than the Waddingtons game.
I hope this helps.
Is it a rare edition?
Before reading your comment I had never heard of Monopoly Stock Exchange.
It turns out that this version of Monopoly is different than your normal Monopoly because players can buy shares in different properties which allows multiple people to own a share of the same property.
It also was designed by Reiner Knizia a well known board game designer and was apparently never officially released in the United States.
A value for the game is a little hard to pinpoint.
It has some value but it is not worth hundreds of dollars.
Amazon has two listings for it but there are no copies available under either listing: .
I hope this helps.
Honestly the only information I could really find for the game was by looking at the box.
First the game is pretty unknown since if it was more well known you should be able to find more about it online.
There are some positives for the game though.
First the game is sealed which always helps the value.
Second the game features an ex-NFL player.
While Larry Centers only played fullback in the NFL, there may be people who would collect things associated with him.
Third it appears that the game is uncommon or possibly rare with how little information there is about the game online.
The value of the game will be determined by how much interest there is in the game which is hard to judge with how little information there is about the game.
I wish I could give you a more definitive answer.
I hope this helped though.
I have an unopened 1991 pressman toy company The Adams Family card game.
I want to sell it.
Do you think there would be interest in it?
In my experience the stranger a game is the more likely it is to be worth money.
That is not always the case though.
I looked up your Addams Family card game and it seems to have a little value but not a ton.
If the game has a barcode you could make a listing for the game on Amazon.
It could take quite a while to sell on Amazon though.
I think the reason that the Addams Family card game 1991 version is not worth more is due to two things.
First the game is somewhat recent being made in the 1990s.
Also the game was made to capitalize on the 1991 movie which means that quite a few copies of the game were probably made.
I hope this helps.
There was a players club.
Is this of interest to collectors?
I am assuming you are talking about this.
I personally had never heard of the game but it actually sounds interesting.
It probably means that there is not a lot of interest in the game though so if you want to sell the game you will probably have to be really patient.
I hope this helps.
One is Campbell Kids Shopping Game.
I was wondering if this type of game would have any value.
I know there are some Campbell Soup collectors out there and just seeing if this type of game would sell and for what value.
I would guess at the very least that is is uncommon at this point.
The age 1955 should also help.
I would have two concerns with regards to value.
First the game was made by Parker Brothers which means that more copies of the game were probably made than most board games from the 1950s.
If the game was made by a smaller publisher possibly a company no longer in existence I would guess that the game would be more valuable since less copies would have been made.
This might not hurt the value that much though since collectors of Parker Brothers games may be interested in picking up the game for their collection.
Before bringing the game to my attention, I had never heard of it before.
Since the game was released quite a few years before I was born I obviously never played the game as a child.
People who have played the game before may have more interest in the game than I would though.
With how little information there is about the game online it is hard to judge the interest that there would be for the game.
If several people are looking for the game though the value could actually get pretty high if you were to put the game on eBay or a similar website and multiple people bid against one another.
As I already mentioned my value estimation is just an educated guess due to the little information I could find for the game.
If the game is quite rare though and multiple people are looking for the game I could see it going for a couple hundred dollars.
It will really come down to how much interest there is in the game though.
If you were planning on selling the game though you may have to be patient though since it might take a while to find someone interested enough in the game to pay what the game is worth.
I wish I could have been more helpful.
Do you know where I can find out of print game instructions?
Also, is there a site you recommend to get instructions from for any game?
Here on Geeky Hobbies I have reviewed around 400 different board games and I include a how to play section in every review.
Board Game Geek has a page for most board games except for some really niche games.
I looked up and it does have a Board Game Geek page.
If you leave a message on the forums for the game asking for instructions a user that owns the game may either give you a scan of the rules or could give you an overview of how to play the game.
It may take a little time though since only 16 people on the website own a copy of the game.
Games are:truth or consequences, michigan rummy, the wizard of oz, go the the head of the class, safely home, smess, finance, paydirt, san juan roulette, emergency, perfection,space tilt, tiddly winks and 13 dead end drive.
I will try to help you as much as I can.
For quite a few of the games I am going to need more information though since there have been many different versions of the game made over the years.
Paydirt has value but it is going to be hard to judge without knowing the year since the game was put out every year for quite a few years.
For Emergency I am assuming you are referring to.
As far as where to sell the games I have three recommendations.
If the game currently has a listing on Amazon, Amazon is probably the place where you are going to get the most for games.
The games have to have all of the pieces though to be sold on Amazon and it could take quite a while to find a buyer.
Your second option is eBay.
You should be able to sell the games quicker on eBay but you generally get less for board games on eBay than you would other places.
The third option I have would be.
Board Game Geek has a lot of board game collectors so you could try to find people who are interested in specific games.
I hope this helped.
Wondering if any are valuable.
Thanks for all the advice given on this web site!
Write me if any of the games pop out as valuable or rare.
After a quick look at your list here is my quick analysis.
The 1940s-1950s Monopoly is kind of hard to pinpoint since so many versions of the game was released during that period.
Condition will be a big are old games worth anything factor.
Does the game have all of the other components that originally came with the game?
The main reason that Monopoly is not worth as much as you would probably expect is that Monopoly is probably the most popular board game of all time and thus millions of copies of the game have been made.
Most people would be fine with a new version of the game so I would guess that the older versions of the game will only appeal to collectors.
This is why condition is really important since collectors will likely be looking for the copies in the best condition.
Without anymore information that is about what I would estimate that it would be worth.
The rest of your games I have put in different price ranges.
These are just estimates and do fluctuate from time to time.
On average though this is about what I would expect you could get from the games.
All of these prices are based on copies that are complete and are in at least acceptable condition.
Honeymooners Game Sequence The following games I would need more information about because there are a lot of similar versions of the game that were created: Chess Teacher Wooden Maze I hope this was helpful.
My son wants to play it soooooooo bad and I want to keep it in the plastic in case are old games worth anything may be worth something someday.
I know these things would be difficult to predict, but in your expert opinion, do you think it will be worth something someday?
First does it say anywhere on the box how many copies of the game were made?
If there are no numbers printed on the box it usually means that the game was mass produced since companies usually like to promote that limited copies of the game were created.
If there were only a couple thousand copies of the game made I could see the value going up if there is future demand for the game.
Another question that I would have is whether this was a more expensive game from the start?
The game came out late last year so the current price probably still reflects the initial sale price of the game.
The final value of the game will be determined by how desired the game is by fans of the game.
It would probably take at least a couple years of the game being out of print before that would happen though.
If you were going to sell the game it would probably take some time to sell as well since most people would probably just buy one of the cheaper versions of the game.
I hope this was helpful.
A-26, looks like 1972 never opened and still wrapped in plastic.
While not worth a ton, Masterpiece has value.
Masterpiece in a game that was originally released in the 1970s where players bought and sold paintings in order to make money.
I have actually reviewed on Geeky Hobbies.
You will have to be patient though since it will probably take time to sell as you will have to wait for someone looking for a pristine copy.
Admirals is a little harder to estimate.
Admirals is a 1970s board game that is basically a naval version of the classic board game Stratego.
Currently Admirals is listed on Amazon but has no copies currently available for sale.
In general games on eBay sell for less than they do on Amazon.
This is just an estimate though.
I hope this helps.
Wondering if you knew a price for Hasbros 1973 The Batman Game?
If the game you are talking about isI found click here copy of the game that sold on eBay a little over a month ago.
I would have to say that I was a little surprised that it sold for that little.
People are willing to spend more on something if they have a better idea of what they are getting.
Second with the game being sold on eBay it was unlikely to sell for as much as it could have since games tend to sell for less on eBay than other sites.
Finally I have a feeling that more copies of the game were made than I originally anticipated.
Companies like Hasbro seemed to start publishing larger quantities of board games in the 1970s and with a Batman license I am guessing that they made quite a few copies of the game.
These are just guesses though.
I hope this helps.
The other game is… Bunco by fundex games, ltd.
As far as value unfortunately neither game is really worth a lot.
I will preface this by saying that I am far from an expert on Monopoly.
As far as value Monopoly is one of the hardest board games to judge as there have been so many versions of the game released over the years.
Most versions of Monopoly are basically worthless but there are some versions that can be really valuable.
For older Monopolies usually the older it is the better.
Based solely on age the game has to be from the 1930s to have much value and not all 1930s versions are that valuable.
With so many copies in existence many old copies of Monopoly are not worth as much as you would expect as many copies still exist to this day.
Other than the really old versions of the game there are some very specific versions of the game that do have some value because they either had unique playing pieces or there is something unique about the components not present in any other versions of the game.
I know some of the sets created during wars that used non-metal playing pieces can have some value.
Does the game box or any of the components have a copyright date on them?
Seeing as I assume your version is quite old, the copyright date likely will be in Roman numerals.
That is mostly because there have been quite a few versions of Scrabble Junior made over the years.
To give you a more accurate picture about the value of the game I will need to know more information about your version of the game.
It would be helpful to know the publisher and the year of the game.
Just to get an idea I quickly looked up French versions of Scrabble on eBay.
I am guessing this is mostly due to there being quite a few copies of the French version of Scrabble out there.
The one good thing for the value of your game is that it is still sealed.
Games that are sealed are worth considerably more than opened copies.
If you have an old version of the game it could be worth a decent amount with it being sealed.
I hope this helps.
Wondering if you could tell me some information regarding the sale of them.
Any ideas or suggestions?
Also, all pieces of each are accounted for, and pristine condition.
In the game players would move around a gameboard trying to finish their objectives while a VHS tape played in the background.
If you want to learn more about the series check out our review of.
The Nightmare and Atmosphere series are a series of board games that have maintained some value.
What is kind of strange about the Nightmare series is that the later games in the series are worth more than the earlier games.
I think this is mostly because the earlier versions were probably reprinted and the series probably started losing popularity towards the end.
Board games have never sold as well on eBay as they do on Amazon.
This is partially due to sellers not being patient and trying to sell things as quickly as possible.
A lot of these valuable board games have a particular audience so it takes time to find the right buyer.
If you were interested in selling the games my recommendation would depend on how quickly you wanted to get rid of them.
If you want to sell them quickly you are probably better off selling them on eBay but you likely will get less for them.
If you are willing to wait longer though you could probably get quite a bit more for them on Amazon.
I want to warn you though that they might take quite a while to sell on Amazon.
Unless you get lucky and find someone who wants them right away you may have to wait months or possibly over a year to sell them.
With Halloween coming up soon though you may be able to sell them quicker and might be able to get more for them from either site since people might want to play them for Halloween.
I hope this helps.
I cannot find this anywhere.
The copyright date shows 1955.
Do the numbers on the boxes mean anything.
This one has a 4521 on the lower left corner of the top and the same number in the lower right hand corner of the actual board game.
Any suggestions how to find more information?
As far as the numbers I believe the numbers are the catalog number for the game.
A lot of older games used to have these numbers.
I am not exactly sure what they were used for but I am guessing they were used to help with orders.
It has a spelling error on one of the spaces Carliol Square.
Does this make it any more desirable.
With a lot of collectibles, misprints do seem to add to the value.
Usually items with misprints or other errors are destroyed before they are sold so they are rarer than a normal version of the same item.
As far as how desirable this version of Monopoly is, I think it would come down to if this was a common misprint or not.
As far as how many were misprinted I honestly have no idea.
I will admit that I am far from an expert on Monopoly values as I am not a Monopoly collector myself.
I could see Monopoly experts being interested in a misprinted copy though.
I machines the slot and play win best what are to it will mostly come down to how much interest there is in that version of Monopoly.
I wish I could have been of more help.
I was wondering if anyone could point me in the right direction.
Its called Thar she Blows!
I could send picture and it has directions and all the pieces.
This game was my grandfathers game as a kid.
Thanks for any info!
I tried to do some research on Thar She Blows!
This is not that surprising for a game from 1939.
My best guess on how to get more information about the game would be to ask a question about the game on the forums of.
I recommend asking the question on Board Game Geek because there are a lot of board game collectors on the site and a lot of users know about more obscure games.
With how many users there are on the site you might be able to find someone that is more familiar with the game.
If you were interested in how valuable the game is, the best I can do is to make a guess.
I am guessing that Thar She Blows was never reprinted so it is probably pretty rare.
The only question about the game being unknown is whether anyone even knows about it or even cares about it.
To get a better idea if people would be interested in the game, I would need a little more information about the game.
Do you know what type of game it is?
Basically can you quickly explain what you do in the game?
It would also be helpful to know what type of theme it has.
For example is it a war game?
Certain collectors are looking for certain types of games so some games have more value just based on the theme.
The best way to gauge a price is to look at what other copies of the game have sold for.
I hope this helps.
If you have any more information I will gladly try to help you as much as I can.
I have a vintage unopened, still in plastic 1974 Grand Master Mind Game.
Could you tell me what the value possibly is for this game?
Just for those who are not familiar with the game I would like to give a little information about the game itself.
Most people are familiar with the board game Mastermind.
With Mastermind being such a hit, over ten different sequels have been made for the game.
One of these sequels is Grand Mastermind.
Due to the fact that there is actually a strategy to automatically win Mastermind, most of these sequels added additional challenge to the game to make it harder to solve.
In Grand Mastermind another element is added to the game which forces players to figure out the color and shape of four different elements.
As far as value Grand Mastermind is rarer than the original version of Mastermind since Grand Mastermind was never reprinted unlike the original game.
As far as value the game has some value.
As I have mentioned in the post eBay prices tend to be lower side for board games though.
I will point out though if you were planning on selling the game on Amazon you will have to be patient since the game could take months to over a year to sell.
I hope this was helpful.
I would say that Marvel Zingo Heroes has some value but I think it is probably artificially high at this point.
I hope this was helpful.
Not even that it exists.
Ebay and google yeild nothing.
Gabriel Sons and Company New York.
Hoping you may be able to shed some light.
I will give you more if needed.
Or pics too… Thanks in advance.
Could you please help.
The Fraggle Trap Game is a board game based on the television show Fraggle Rock.
The game appears to be a roll and move style game which was made for younger children.
The game was made by Falcon Games which is a UK based board game publisher.
If you were planning on selling the game in the UK I would estimate the value would be around that much.
If so the value of the game would probably go up quite a bit maybe two to four times as much as the copy that did sell since board game collectors generally like purchasing games that are still factory sealed.
As far as outside of the UK I think the valuation becomes a little more interesting.
Fraggle Rock is one of those shows that actually has quite a few fans which should drive demand for the game.
I am a little curious about how many copies of the game were made as I am not that familiar with Falcon Games.
Being a licensed product there probably were a decent amount of copies of the game produced but probably not as many copies as there would be if the game was produced in the United States.
In the United States we had our own Fraggle Rock game produced by Milton Bradley at around the same time as the Fraggle Trap game but the two games are totally different games.
Being a British game though I would guess Fraggle Trap would have more value as it would be quite a bit harder to find in the United States.
Selling board games internationally can be kind of a pain though.
Would love to know more specifics of the game and potential value.
For more information on the game I would recommend checking out the page as it has quite a bit of information about the game.
We also reviewed a similar game here on Geeky Hobbies called.
As far as value it is going to be kind of hard to judge.
There have been quite a few versions of the game created over the years.
There have even been some recent reprints of the game that have been made to look like the old versions of the game.
I think the value will mostly be reliant on how old the game truly is.
If the game is truly from the 1890s or the early 1900s I can see quite a bit of value as games that old are valuable due to the fact that not many of them are still in existence.
To get the most for the game though you would need to find a board game collector that is really interested in the age of the game.
The instruction sheet was copyright 1928 by Parker Brothers, Inc.
Can you tell me anything about this game?
Basically the game seems to be a collection of other board games Ludo, Auto Race, Checkers, and Backgammon.
Ludo, Checkers and Backgammon are games that are over a hundred years old and are at this point public domain so anyone can legally make their own copy so there are many versions of the games available.
The game does seem like a pretty generic spin and move game though.
If you are looking for a value I can only make a guess.
It is not that easy to find games from 1928.
What hurts the value is that it is basically a collection of games with three of them being in the public domain.
The one outlier is Auto Race which might not have ever been reprinted.
There were quite a few similar racing games made in the same time period though and their values tend to differ quite a bit.
How many copies of the game are still in existence due to how old it is?
Also how interested are people in the Auto Race game?
Without any recent sales data I can only guess at the value.
Looked on Board Game Geek, Ebay and Amazon, no luck How can I know the value?
As far as value I can only take an educated guess.
There are some positive and negative things when it comes to the value.
First it is good that the game is unopened.
Some people are willing to pay quite a bit more for a game if it is still factory sealed since there is a guarantee that it will have all of the pieces and they will be in good shape.
The other potential benefit is that the game seems to have been made by a small publisher as I have never heard of Normatt Products.
On the other side though the thing that is working the most against the game is the fact that it is a trivia game.
There is a chance that might not be the case for Hit Record Trivia.
With the game being made in 1973 the audience for the game will be fans of music from that era that also like trivia games.
While there will probably be some people that are looking for that I would guess that the game will take quite a while to sell and might not sell for a lot.
I have the box with dice, pegs and tumblers, but no board.
I can send a photo.
The Game of India is a game that has been around for over 1,000 years so it is currently in the public domain which means anyone can produce their own version of the game.
This is one of the reasons why there have been so many different versions of the game produced over the years.
As far as value the game being in poor condition and missing the gameboard is not going to help.
If the game would have any real value if would be because of the age.
If the game is from the late 1800s or early 1900s the box and pieces may have some value to someone who collects old board games and is either missing the box or the pieces to the game.
In older games the copyright date is usually written in Roman numerals.
I hope this helped.
The parts remaining clearly identify it as the Parchisi variety.
What was most puzzling was no info on the maker, The Phillips Company.
Not losing sleep over it though.
I will toss it onto the web and see what happens.
I appreciate your comments!
Have a game that I could not find on amazon, ebay or board geek.
Rules booklet says made by Outwit Company box 2921 Los Angeles ca.
Can not find info on company.
Any help would be appreciated.
Do the rules for the game seem to be the same as this version of?
this web page the rules seem to be the same, I have the following theory about the game.
I am guessing your copy of the game was the first version of the game produced.
With the game being produced by the Outwit Company I am guessing that the game was self published as most games made by a company with the same name as the game itself are self published games.
The developer then either sent a copy of their game to Parker Brothers or someone at Parker Brothers discovered the game.
Parker Brothers then picked up the rights to publish the game which are the versions of the game you usually find.
The value is probably going to really depend on how many copies of the game were produced.
If the game were to have value the game would have had to be pretty rare and you would need to find someone that wants the original version of the game.
I wish I could have given you more information.
It seems more like the game of checkers, with slightly different rules and different shaped cloth game board.
Definitely, its a novelty and its interesting to speculate about it.
I certainly appreciate all your help and insight.
I am guessing that Portfolio was a generic version of Monopoly created to try and cash in on the popularity of Monopoly.
As far as value I can only give you a guess.
The fact that the game was produced to fit in a tube instead of a box probably means that the game was made by a smaller publisher.
This means that there probably were not that many copies of the game made but few people probably know about it.
If you are selling the game in the United States it could add to the value as the game would be harder to find in the United States.
I think the thing working against the game the most is the fact that it is a Monopoly clone game.
These type of games are usually not that much in demand as most people have their own version of Monopoly already.
As far as how to price the game this is a total guess.
You could always relist the game though and gradually lower the price until it sells.
I wish I could give you a better estimate but without being able to find any information about the game all I can do is guess about the value.
So mint mint condition.
Never opened, never played.
Never touched by human hands at all.
There are good things and bad things as it comes to the value of your Clue game.
There have been many different versions of Clue created over the years.
The game is also still made to this day so you can pick up a new copy of the game for cheap at almost any store.
The good news is that your copy of the game is still sealed.
Sealed copies of older games do maintain some value.
Unfortunately I am going to need more information about the game before I could make an estimation about whether the game has value.
Can you find the copyright date for the game?
If the game is an older version of Scrabble the copyright date will likely be in roman numerals.
It would also help to know if your Scrabble is a special edition or if it is just a normal version of Scrabble.
Generally speaking normal versions of Scrabble are not worth that much.
This is due to the game being popular and having been made for many years.
If a person is just looking for a copy of Scrabble they can easily find a cheap version of the game which means casual Scrabble players will not be the target audience if the game were valuable.
For the game to be valuable there would have to be something special about it that would appeal to fans and collectors of Scrabble.
If the game is one of the first sets made it may maintain some value.
Otherwise the game could have some value if there is something unique about your particular version of the game.
I wish I could have been more helpful.
On Board Game Geek I was only able to find one Wells Fargo game.
For those of you who are curious this Wells Fargo game has players retrieving stolen items and returning them for the reward money.
While the name is different, it seems like the game was also published under the name Wells Fargo Game as well.
I actually think your game may just be the Australian version of the game.
I say this because John Sands was responsible for printing a lot of Milton Bradley games publisher of Tales of Wells Fargo in Australia.
As far as Tales of Wells Fargo, the United States version of the game seems to be semi-valuable.
As far as the Australian version of the game I would guess the game would be around the same value.
If your game is different than the game I linked to you will probably have to give me some additional information since that is the only Wells Fargo board game that I was able to find.
If you can give me more information I will try to help you as much as I can.
It is a game called sssScat by Cadaco, Inc.
The price is still on the box.
Any information would be appreciated.
The game is not even listed on Board Game Geek which is strange since most board games except for games made by small publishers are on the site.
Basically the only thing I could find about the game is a couple of pictures.
If you had the game would you hold onto it or what would you do with it?
It is not in great shape, the box is pretty beaten but it seems complete.
I have no idea if anyone would be willing to buy it specially because it is in Spanish.
Can you help me out with this one?
On the positive side the game appears to be an older war game.
There are people that collect older war games and thus they can sell for quite a bit of money.
When you factor in that the game is in Spanish and is about South American battles specifically Chilean battles I would guess that the game was printed in South America most likely in Chile.
If this was the case it likely had an even more limited print run than a similar game that was produced in the United States.
With all these factors added together I would guess that the game might be pretty rare.
The second issue is that the game actually has a print and play version up on Board Game Geek.
Instead of buying an original copy of the game some people may prefer to just print out this are old games worth anything of the game.
I think quite a few of the people that would be interested in the game though would like the original version of the game.
I think the more important thing about the condition is whether the game has all of the components.
In these type of war games they are usually missing some of the little soldier pieces.
As a lot of copies lose pieces over time, a complete copy of the game will have quite a bit more value.
If possible I would recommend comparing what pieces you have with the pictures on the Board Game Geek page as they seem to picture all of the components that originally came with the game.
This is going to be hard to judge especially since I am not a huge war game fan myself.
It probably depends on how many people are interested in Chilean history.
I would think that there would eventually be someone that would be interested in the game but it might take quite a while to find a person that would pay a fair price for the game.
These value estimates are just guesses though as it is ultimately going to come down if there are people that really want the game.
I hope this was helpful.
From the 60s or 70s I guess.
What do you think?
It is a game made by a designer that clearly was not a fan of Nixon as the game revolves around one player playing as Nixon and the other players trying to beat him.
It sounds a lot like a Monopoly style game with a few tweaks.
For more information about the game check out its.
I did some research and found some copies of the game for sale on Amazon.
I have to say that I am a little surprised that the game is not worth more than it is.
I find only one or two listings for it on both Amazon and Board Game Geek and they all appear to be the same seller since they all show the same slightly crushed box.
Price seems very high.
It is in great condition, possibly never used.
The game was published in 1992.
Can you recommend anyone knowledgeable?
If you give me the name of the board game I would be willing to look into it.
I can find nothing anywhere.
It is very strange.
In my opinion I would guess that the issue with your game is probably a limited issue with the game.
When the board was being printed I am guessing there was some issue with the printer or it was smeared in some way during the process.
In my experience with other games that have blurred printing it is generally a limited problem that only affects a small number of copies of the game.
With misprints I think people are usually looking for typos, or other printing errors.
I could be wrong though as there might be Monopoly collectors that try to acquire as many misprinted games as possible.
Usually there is a way to contact the company at the end of the instructions or there should be information on their website.
The game sold 80,000 copies.
I have the original and certified copy member 1 along with some memorabilia including a copy of the TV commercial.
So you know of a specialist collector or auctioneer that might be interested please?
You could always list it on eBay but you may need to be patient as you wait for the right person to find your listing in order to get the most for it.
If you were to sell the item I would definitely detail these parts of the game as they should make the item sell for more.
I can not find it on Ebay or Amazon and was wondering where I can find a copy.
To me it would seem like there are no copies left or they are in private collections.
If you live in Europe I would assume the game would be easier to find as the game was only made in Britain which is not surprising as the game is about British politics.
If you live in the United States or outside of Europe I think the game will be quite a bit harder to find as most copies of the game are probably in Europe so shipping the game overseas will add quite a bit to the cost.
As far as where to purchase the game, at this time it looks like it is going to be hard to find.
There is an for the item but there are currently none for sale.
There are a couple of people on that have the game available for trade so you could maybe talk with them and see what they are willing to sell it for.
Otherwise I would keep monitoring the Amazon page as someone might eventually put the game up for sale.
I read recently on Google that if the item has a manufactured default it is worth more.
My game has different publish dates than the directions.
The directions are the right ones for the game.
The Monopoly games that are worth more are usually ones where the words are misspelled, the game has the wrong colors or other similar more noticeable errors.
I have a feeling that the discrepancy between the gameboard and the instructions can be attributed to one of two things.
If you bought the game used it could be due to a previous owner just mixing the board from one copy with the rules from another copy.
I think the more likely explanation is due to how older board games were created.
I have seen Monopoly and other games that have been reprinted several times having instructions dated significantly older than the rest of the game.
I hope this was helpful.
I was surprised to find out that the game the one made by Waffle House is worth more than I was expecting.
I am guessing this is mostly because the game was made by Waffle House.
These copies were used as well so your copy should be worth more.
Generally sealed copies tend to sell for around twice as much as an unsealed copy.
You might have to be patient though as you have to find someone who is interested in the game to get maximum value.
I am hoping someone can answer a question for me, I picked up a Cranium game in brand new condition at a thrift shop and when I looked it up I could only find a few for sale.
Its the Canadian edition 2.
I am wondering if this is really what I could sell it for?
I think this is the case because the American versions of Cranium are generally not worth that much.
What I am guessing is that there were other copies of the game for sale that sold.
After those copies sold there were no other copies left except for the overpriced copy.
How rare is this game, and is it worth anything?
I would say that the game is at least uncommon and may be rare.
I did find a copy that recently sold on eBay though.
I would guess you could sell it for that much if you wanted to sell it on eBay.
With it being more of an unknown game though I would caution you that it might take a while to sell the game for that price.
There is a good chance that you may have to list it a couple times before it actually sells.
I think it would eventually sell though.
I hope this helped.
I am guessing you are talking about this version of?
As far as value the best I can give you is an educated guess.
There are no listings on Amazon, eBay, or even Board Game Geek.
On the positive side the game actually appears to be pretty rare.
In addition to the game probably being rare, it is one of those niche games that tend to be valuable.
Games based on real events that also include some interesting mechanics generally sell for more than games that are like many other games.
On the other hand the game is old enough that it has been out of print for a long time.
This likely means that not a lot of copies are still around today.
The game sounds like a roll and move game with a twist.
Games that are highly rated are more likely to sell as people want to play them as well as collect them.
Games with lower ratings still sell but they are sold more for their collectibility than actually wanting to play them.
The other factor potentially working against the game is the fact that the game appears to be pretty obscure.
A lot of people have probably never heard of the game before and thus it will be hard to find a market for the game.
It does not mean that there is not a market but if you plan on selling the game you might have to be patient as it likely will take some time.
The ultimate value is going to come down to finding https://agohome.ru/are/what-are-some-fun-online-games-to-play-with-friends.html who is interested in the game.
This might take some time so you might have to be patient if you are planning on selling it.
I have tried to research with no luck.
I can not find this game anywhere.
Singer1890New YorkUSA.
Under the name it reads.
Thank you for any help you can give me.
After some research I did find its page.
First of all does the game have the outer box and all of the components?
Is the game in good shape for its age?
The game will still have value if it is not in great shape but it will be worth even more if it is in good shape due to its age.
I think there are quite a few positives for the game and one potential issue.
Games made before 1900 generally have quite a bit of value as they are some of the oldest board games still in existence.
Another positive is that the game seems to have never been reprinted.
There are definitely people interested in board games from the 1800s.
The book apparently has photocopies of all of the boards, pieces and rules for all of the games featured.
Therefore if someone wanted to play the game they could just get the book.
This will drive away people that are only interested in playing the game.
There should still be people interested in purchasing the game as a collectible though.
I know board games from the 1800s that are in good shape can go for hundreds to even thousands of dollars.
As long as the game is not in terrible shape though, I would expect it to be quite valuable.
I have tried looking the game up itself and came up short and I tried getting some history on the company and no luck either.
I am guessing is not the game you are talking about as this is the only game I could find on Board Game Geek that even came close to your description.
Based on my experience, I would are old games worth anything that your game was made by a small local publisher as I have never heard of Toys and Games of Nevada before.
I am guessing it was a game that was created to be sold as a souvenir for people visiting Las Vegas.
Most states seem to have these type of games that are made by local publisher that try to cash in on local attractions.
Based on what these type of games are normally like, I would guess that it is either a Monopoly style game or a trivia game about Las Vegas.
This is due to a couple factors.
The one positive for your game though is that it is based on Las Vegas.
There might not be a lot of people interested in the game itself but there are quite a few people interested in Las Vegas.
With the game featuring casinos that are no longer available, that should add to its value for Las Vegas collectors.
I would guess that people who collect Las Vegas items would be interested in the game.
It is in a black case and I have never heard of it.
I looked it up online and see some versions of it but they seem to be a different model.
Can you tell me more about it?
why are only indian reservations it worth anything?
I would love to please click for source more about it and if it has any value.
Looking at Board Game Geek I found this.
Here are the different of the game.
Is your game one of the versions shown?
The game I linked to is a board game similar to Monopoly that involves purchasing and selling oil.
The first page I linked to has a list of what originally came with the game if you wanted to check if your game has all of the original components.
I hope this helped.
My version is different.
Is the gameplay similar to what is outlined on the page I linked to a Monopoly style game?
If it is a special edition it should add some value to the game.
How much it adds will come down to how much someone is looking for the game.
Never been played, cardboard bits https://agohome.ru/are/games-that-are-fun-and-free-online.html all still unpunched.
Still has the old order forms etc.
Box is in excellent condition too.
I feel like this would be worth something but hard to know where to start!
Any ideas if this is valuable?
First of all, yes the crayons are used in the game.
Basically in the game you run a railroad company that is trying to build a train network to make the most money.
The crayons are used to draw on the map to indicate which track lines you own.
As far as value I would put the game in the valuable but not super valuable range.
Empire Builder is actually a pretty popular board game that inspired https://agohome.ru/are/why-are-video-games-in-australia-so-expensive.html whole line of train board games.
On the positive side the what are the best strategy games for android join is going to be a market for the game.
Especially with the game being the first edition and being unplayed, there will be people interested in buying the game.
On the negative side the game has been reprinted at least seven different times throughout the years.
There will be people interested in the first edition, but the additional versions will probably drop the value some.
I hope this helped.
Amazon, eBay, game board geeks.
The only information I could find about it was that they generally make versions of public domain games like Chess, Checkers, and Backgammon.
As it is a public domain game no one own the rights to the game so anyone can make and sell their own setmost sets of Backgammon are not worth much money.
At the same time though there are a lot of Backgammon fans.
People who are really into What are the best slot are willing to spend money on high quality sets.
The value of your set is going to depend on the component quality and the age.
If the set is well made and was expensive when it was first made, it will probably still have value.
Also if the set is really old 100+ years old I could see it having some value.
It is in good condition and appears to have all the pieces.
It was released in 1986.
I found information on Board Game Geek, but did not find any pricing information.
Is this game worth that much or is that the seller just picking their own price?
Before your comment I had never heard of Stealth before.
After some brief research the game actually looks pretty interesting as it combines a sci-fi theme with an abstract game.
One comment even mentioned that the game is rare.
The game has all the makings of a game that could be worth that much or even more.
The actual price is going to come down to the demand for the game though.
For these type of games that most people have never heard of, the price comes down to if someone is looking for the game.
The game seems rare enough and has all of the things I look for when estimating whether a game will be valuable.
If someone is looking for the game I would guess they would be willing to pay around the price of the eBay listing.
I am not familiar enough with the game to know whether there is a real demand for it.
One thing I know for sure though is that you likely will have to be patient if you ultimately end up choosing to sell the game.
I hope this was helpful.
Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published.
Notify me of new posts by email.
To support the blog and keep it free for all users, Geeky Hobbies utilizes various affiliate programs to earn commissions.
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.
We are also members of the eBay Partner Network.

G66YY644
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
50 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

What kind of Atari is it? It is more than likely a 2600, which would mean it's worth between 30 and 70 dollars depending on the model, condition, and rarity of the games it comes with.


Enjoy!
HTTP Error 403
Valid for casinos
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
Best games to play on an old PC

T7766547
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 200

The Duck Tales 2 video game for the NES does not seem like it would be high on the list of valuable games, but some fans argue that it is one of the best video games of all time. It's a kid's game, though, and a sequel at that, so most of probably sold our copy at a garage sale when we outgrew our adorable obsession with cartoon ducks.


Enjoy!
HTTP Error 403
Valid for casinos
How to Spot Valuable Board Games | Geeky Hobbies
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
10 Rarest N64 Games Ever

JK644W564
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
60 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

Much like comic books, old games in pristine condition, especially limited releases, can fetch a premium on sites like eBay. Your Old Video Games Might Actually Be Worth a Lot of Money Subscribe


Enjoy!
The best classic PC games still worth playing | PCWorld
Valid for casinos
The best classic PC games still worth playing | PCWorld
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
People collect a lot of things.
From sports collectibles, to books and antiques; there are collectors for everything.
Board games are no exception.
There are a lot of people that collect board games, myself included since I own hundreds of board games.
With collectors comes value so as board games have become more popular, the prices for rare board games have risen quite a bit lately.
While most board games are worth very little, there are plenty of board games worth hundreds to thousands of dollars.
Being a collector of board games for quite a few years, I have run into a lot of board games.
I have learned quite a bit about board game values from my years collecting them and this post is going to outline what I have learned.
These are only tips as there are games that will defy these tips.
Condition is not going to make a worthless game valuable but it is big in determining the value of a rare game.
A rare game in good condition can sell for multiple times more than the same game that is in poor condition.
A game that has never been played before is guaranteed to have all of the components which is key for a lot of rare games since it is hard are old games worth anything find parts for these games.
It can be a hassle to find the missing parts for a game and collectors will pay a premium for not having to find the pieces that a game is missing.
Sealed games are also more likely to have boxes in good to great condition which is really important to some collectors.
It is really hard to find rare games in an unopened condition.
Condition is still key even if the game is opened.
The most important thing is that the game has all of the pieces.
A game that is missing non important pieces like dice or playing pieces are less likely to be affected as games that are missing key components.
Missing even are old games worth anything piece, even a minor one, drops the value of most games by a significant amount but the games still have some value.
Some collectors will buy incomplete games hoping to get the missing parts from other people.
Game pieces for rare games can also sell for a lot of money especially if it is a game that is regularly missing pieces.
If you find a rare game that has a lot of the pieces but not all of them you can make quite a bit of money selling the pieces off individually to people that are just missing a couple pieces from their copy of the game.
Just having all of the pieces is not enough for some collectors though.
The condition of the contents is important as well.
If a person is paying a lot for a game they are looking for a game in good condition.
Creases in cards or the board, broken pieces, and other imperfections in the components will affect the value of the game.
The quality of the box in particular is really important since a lot of people like displaying their rare games so a good box is important.
Being Old Does Not Necessarily Make A Game Valuable The first thing people think makes a game valuable is age.
If a game is old it must be valuable right?
In the world of board games that is true to a point.
Being old rarely if ever decreases the potential value of a game.
If you can find a board game from the early 1900s 1930s or earlier or even the 1800s it is likely to be worth money.
A lot of board games from the late 1800s and early 1900s were made of paper and wood.
Through the years many of the games from this era have been destroyed, damaged, lost pieces, or thrown away.
Most of the copies still in existence are already in the hands of a collector.
If you can find one though it will likely be worth a lot of money.
There are some exceptions though with a big one being the game Monopoly.
You free and online that are fun games own a really old copy of Monopoly from the 1930s or 1940s and think it must be worth a lot of money.
Unfortunately old Monopolies are not worth nearly as much as you would expect.
The main reason is that so many copies of the game were made that despite being really old, many of the older copies of the game are still in existence.
The only old Monopolies that are actually worth a lot of money are the first copies made.
The odds of you finding really old board games is not particularly high so what about more recent games.
In most cases if the game is newer than the 1960s or 1970s, the age is not really going to affect the value.
There are a lot of valuable games made after the 1960s but they are usually valuable for one of the other reasons listed below.
Has the Average Person Heard Of It One of the first things you should ask yourself about a game is if the average person has heard of the game.
If you asked random people on the street if they know a particular game and half or more of them have heard of it, it is unlikely to be worth anything.
Your copy of Monopoly, Scrabble, Trivial Pursuit, Sorry, etc are not going to be worth anything.
With so many games made, anyone who wants the game can find a copy for cheap.
If no one wants a game because it is bad or everyone who wants the game already has a copy, the game will have no value.
Hundreds to thousands of games are made every year so there are a bunch of games that no one has heard of before.
The themes that do best for older board games can be the opposite for new games are movies, television shows, cartoons, singers, sports stars and anything else from pop culture.
Games about wars and other specific events can also be sought after by collectors.
The reason these games are valuable is that there are multiple types of collectors interested in the item.
In the future more recent games may go up in value based on their theme as people become more nostalgic for the theme.
Some publishers are well known for creating fun games or games with great components which drives up the prices of their games.
Milton Bradley, Hasbro, and Parker Brothers games in particular are rarely worth anything unless they are quite old.
If you find a game from any of these companies that was made prior to 1940 though they could be worth money except for Monopoly.
Most really old board games are worth money especially if they were made by companies that no longer exist.
Games made by the in particular are worth quite a bit of money.
They were actually one of Parker Brothers biggest rivals until Parker Brothers bought them out in 1920.
A lot of these old board game companies went out of business a long time ago many during the Great Depression.
Since a lot of these really old games are already owned by collectors, there are more modern game publishers that have made a lot of valuable board games.
One company in particular is Avalon Hill.
Avalon Hill is still around even though they are currently a subsidiary of Hasbro.
Before joining Hasbro, Avalon Hill was well known for their war games and detailed strategy games.
A lot of their games were never massively produced because a lot of their titles are gauged towards specific audiences.
Their fans love their games though so some collectors are willing to pay quite a bit of money for them.
Most Avalon Hill games come with a lot of cardboard components though so they can be missing pieces.
Their main line of games were the bookshelf game series which featured board games the size of books that you could fit on your shelf.
TSR is another board game publisher that has made a lot of valuable board games.
TSR mostly made tabletop RPGs like the original Dungeons and Dragons.
Desirable Genres Some board game genres tend to be more valuable than others.
One genre in particular that creates a lot of valuable games is the war game.
War games are one of the oldest genres and have a dedicated fan base.
The more detailed the game is number of components can be a good indicator of value as well.
Avalon Hill is probably the biggest and most well known war game publisher.
Miniature games are also generally quite expensive.
Miniature games are games that use a bunch of little figures for gameplay.
An example is Warhammer 40K.
The figures generally feature a lot of detail which means they cost a lot when they were originally sold and usually hold their value over time.
Tabletop RPGs can also be quite valuable especially if they are more obscure and had only one printing.
TSR RPGs in particular can be worth quite a bit of money.
Special editions of board games usually include higher quality components which lead to higher prices.
A lot of collectors are looking for the special editions of their favorite games because they want the higher quality components.
Some special editions originally sold for hundreds to thousands of dollars.
These special editions can be worth a lot more than they originally sold for because many times there is more demand than supply.
Two ways to tell how much a game originally cost is to look at the quantity and quality of the components.
Quantity is a good way to indicate the original cost of a lot of games.
If the game comes with a lot of components outside of cards it was probably pretty expensive when it was originally made.
Games that include a lot of figures in particular are usually expensive and usually retain their value if all of the pieces are included.
Quality is also a sign of the original cost.
Obviously the special editions made with expensive materials like gold or jewels are going to be valuable just based on the materials used.
Quality is also shown in the detail put into figures and other game components.
If the game has a lot of custom components and it looks like a lot of time was spent creating the components, the game was probably pretty expensive.
The Forgotten Gems For every Monopoly, Trivial Pursuit, Scrabble, etc.
These games never became popular enough to be re-released.
Even if the games never became popular, these games do have their fans.
People remember playing these games and are longing to play them again or they just heard about games with in that all september are free gold and want to try them out.
Since these games are rare due to their limited popularity, people are willing to pay quite a bit of money for them.
Most games from the 1970s to mid 1990s are generally worth very little.
A lot of these games were mass produced and the games that were popular have been reproduced many times over.
This time range is ripe for these forgotten gems though.
A lot of these games bombed and were never made again.
People enjoyed some of these games though and are willing to pay more than you would expect to relive childhood memories.
Some examples of forgotten gems include Fireball Island and Dark Tower.
Both of these games were made by Milton Bradley in the 1980s.
The reason these games are valuable is because a lot of people really like these games despite not being very popular when they first came out.
Players have lost their copies of the games over the years or people have just recently heard about the games and want their own copy of the game which drives demand for the games.
A lot of people purchase these games because they want to play a game that they missed out on when it was first released.
These cult games can really grow an audience which drives up the price.
These are the valuable board games you are most likely to find because it includes more recent games which are much easier to find since more copies were produced and they are newer so more copies are still in existence.
Adult games are usually a better bet to be valuable.
I think the main reason is that they are more enjoyable for collectors to actually play.
While some collectors might be fine with just putting the game on the shelf, most people want to play their games.
This usually leads to more valuable games.
Generally this applies more to older games than newer games since companies are starting to make games based on stranger themes as the hobby continues to grow.
Stunning Artwork Some collectors buy board games to be able to play them while other collectors buy board games for display purposes.
Just like some people collect records for their cover art, the same applies to board games.
Collectors who are interested in artwork want colorful and interesting artwork.
A box with generic artwork is not going to be that interesting to collectors.
If yes the game could hold some value if some of the other factors are true as well age is pretty important for box artwork.
In addition to the boxes, collectors are also interested in games with really colorful and interesting gameboards.
People like to display gameboards that have really nice artwork.
Desirable Designers Just like people have their favorite directors, a lot of people have favorite board game designers.
These people will buy almost every game made by the designer.
This means that every game made by that designer has demand.
Most well known designers have some valuable games but most of their games are not that expensive.
The designers whose whole collection is valuable are those designers that make high quality games in limited runs.
This means their games can get quite expensive.
The Game Is Actually Good While pretty obvious, if a game is good it is likely to be worth more.
Who wants to buy a bad game?
Most good games are actually pretty cheap because they are mass produced to meet demand.
These games regularly get reproduced in order to capitalize on their popularity which drives down prices.
A good place to check whether a board game is good is.
Where to Check Board Game Values and Sell Them So you think you have a valuable board game?
You now have to do your research.
Checking sites like can give you an indication of whether a game is rare.
The best way to know if a board game is valuable though is to just look it up.
The two main places to buy and sell board games are Amazon and eBay.
Of the two I personally prefer selling games on Amazon.
I prefer Amazon for one simple reason, you can usually get more for a game on Amazon than you can on eBay.
You might incur a lot of listing fees relisting an item on eBay over and over again waiting for the right person to find the item.
Amazon and Amazon buyers are a lot pickier than eBay though.
If your game is in poor condition, you might not want to sell it on Amazon.
If the game is missing pieces I would highly recommend selling it somewhere else.
To sell on Amazon you need to read the selling guidelines closely and follow them or Amazon can revoke your selling privileges quickly.
Be sure to be thorough in your description of the item though because collectors expect the item to arrive in a condition similar to that of which you described.
If the game is not in high demand though you might have to pay listing fees every time you relist the item.
The third place I would look to sell a game is on Board Game Geek.
Board Game Geek has a marketplace where people can list games for sale.
The good thing about Board Game Geek is that it could be much easier to find someone who wants your game since Board Game Geek caters to board game fans.
Items in the marketplace are displayed on the page for the game that you are selling so anyone who is interested in that game will see your listing.
Your Thoughts Do you currently own any valuable board games?
What games do or did you own?
Am I missing any tips on spotting valuable board games?
Share your thoughts in the comments section.
June 29, 2016 at 10:03 am hi there, recently got some old board games and was wondering if they are worth much or not???
The first thing I would do would be to check if the games are on Amazon or eBay.
If they are on either site that should give you a pretty good idea of whether the games are valuable.
If you can find results on eBay I would recommend looking at the completed listings there is a spot on the left sidebar that lets you sort results since completed listings actually shows what an item sold for.
If the games are not on either Amazon or eBay, a good source would probably be BoardGameGeek.
BoardGameGeek is a great website to find out about more obscure board games.
Interest in the game is probably going to depend on factors such as the theme of the game, condition, and the other things I mention in the post.
I hope this helps you.
If so maybe you can answer a click the following article />Were games like the 1938 parker bros Lone ranger ever sold without the Box.
In other words the board and the pieces sold separately but not coming in the blue box.
Looking at Board Game Geek I think I found the game you are talking about.
The main version of the game did seem to come with a full sized box.
This version has the board and a smaller box that holds the components.
Is this the version you are talking about?
I actually think Parker Brothers did this with quite a few of their other older board games.
I wonder if this was like how today there are normal and deluxe versions.
If this was the case I am guessing the version without the outer box was the cheaper version of the game.
This was well before my time though so it is just an educated guess.
I have been unable to find these anywhere to check on their value.
Can you help me please?
Based on some quick research I think one of the games could be worth a moderate amount while the other unfortunately is not going to be worth much.
If your Dallas in the Box is thisit unfortunately is not worth much.
Being a big Green Bay Packers fan I actually own a copy of the game which I hope to play soon and post a review on this site.
As far as value it tends to fluctuate a little on eBay and it is not listed on Amazon.
I think that is a little on the low side because it is currently the offseason and the game should sell for more during the football season and will probably sell for themost around November to early December since you will then get Packer fans wanting to buy the game for a Christmas gift.
Condition is going to matter quite a bit though.
Does the game have all of the contents?
What does the box look like split corners, stains, creases, tears, marks, etc.
Condition is going to be important since Packer article source who want to buy the game as a collectible will likely want to display it in their homes so if the box is in good condition it will likely sell for more.
If you were thinking about selling the game I would suggest waiting until at least the start of football season and I would probably recommend waiting until closer to November due to Christmas shopping.
If you wanted to sell it I think the best options would be either or.
Taking good pictures and describing the condition of the game the best you can should help make the game sell for more.
I hope this helps.
It is in good condition and I would to know if its worth anything.
Please send me your email address so I can show you pictures of the boardgame.
I am assuming that you are talking about.
The New Game of Human Life was originally made in 1790 but was apparently reprinted at least a couple times throughout the years.
The true value of the game comes down to if it was an original printing or one of the earlier reprints.
If it is the original printing or one of the first re-prints I would guess the game could be worth hundreds to thousands of dollars.
If the game is not that old though I think click could still have some value as long as it is not a recent reprint less than 50 years old.
I wish you luck in finding out more about your game.
Usually special editions of board games can be worth quite a bit of money.
World of Warcraft is also still pretty popular so that should make the game more valuable.
Also does the package say when the game was made?
Looking at I found two different types of World of Warcraft Mahjong sets.
There were also a couple 2015 sets from Blizzcon.
I hope this helps.
Battling Tops has some value.
This is typical since most board games sell for more on Amazon than eBay.
It probably will sell for more as we get closer to Halloween though.
click the following article the three Kerplunk is probably worth the least.
Being the most well known game, it had more copies made and there have been several reprints of the game throughout the years.
This reduces the value of the game since unless a person wants a specific version of the game you can find a cheaper new version of the game.
I hope this helps.
Personally I never heard of the board game Secret Code.
I am assuming this is an older game?
If it is an older game the copyright date may be in Roman numerals.
Looking up the game on Board Game Geek I found three results for Secret Code.
The other game I found was.
Apparently one of the names that Mastermind has used in the past is Secret Code.
It is not that uncommon for board games to go under different names in different countries.
I also looked up Hamleys on Board Game Geek and only found a couple games and none match Secret Code.
I am guessing that your game is not in the Board Game Https://agohome.ru/are/which-gamehouse-games-are-free.html catalog.
If your game is not a version of Mastermind can you send me some more information like the year or simple explanation of how the game is played and I will try to get you some more information about the game.
Due to this fact there have been a lot of different Charades games made throughout the years.
With all of these different versions of the game, none of the versions of Charades seem to be worth much.
I hope this helps with your decision of whether to open the game.
There are a couple of marks on the box and a small crease to the right side of the midline join on the board but it still lies flat when opened.
Is this a game that is sought after?
Any information you may have would be much appreciated.
Thank you in advance.
Thank you for the question.
Kingmaker is a 1974 war game about the War of the Roses which took place in 1400s England.
While Ariel made the original version of the game in 1974, two years later it was picked up by Avalon Hill who was well known for making war games.
Kingmaker has a lot of the things that you are looking for in a valuable board game.
These types of games were pretty niche since not a lot of people want to play a game about war in are old games worth anything England.
The game was also picked up by Avalon Hill which means that it is a pretty well regarded game.
The game is actually well received by the board game community as evidenced by.
The game also has not had a recent reprint since the latest version of the game was released in 1988.
Your copy having all of the pieces is also important since these older war games came with a lot of small pieces which are really easy to lose so it is hard to find a complete copy.
Looking at Amazon I found a couple versions of the game for sale.
There are a couple catches though.
This means that if you want to sell the game you will have to sell it onor somewhere else.
This is actually pretty typical of eBay since board games never sell for as much on eBay as they do are cash or tournaments profitable Amazon.
Board Game Geek usually has a pretty good grasp on how much a game is worth since the site is for board game enthusiasts so they generally have a good idea of what the game is worth.
So the value of the game will probably depend on where you would sell it.
I will warn you ahead of time that it could take over a year to sell on Amazon.
A positive in your case is that the game has all of the pieces.
The wear on the box and the small crease on the board may slightly affect the value but you are going to have those issues with any game from the 1970s that has been opened.
I hope this helps.
I have never heard of the the puzzle game Hitler Vs Enemy before.
To make an educated guess though I would need some more information.
You list it as a puzzle game.
Is it mostly just a puzzle or is it more of a game?
In general I would say that a game would be worth more than a puzzle but there are puzzles that can be worth quite a bit if they are old and are of a subject that people are interested in which based on the title your puzzle game would probably fit since a lot of people are interested in World War 2.
Is there a copyright date printed on the box?
If it is from the 1930s-1950s it could be worth a lot especially considering the topic.
There are also a lot of collectors of World War 2 memorabilia so World War 2 and board game collectors could be interested in the game.
If it is actually from the 1930s-1950s and is more of a game than a puzzle it could be worth hundreds to thousands if it is a rare game that people are actually interested in.
This is just a guess though since I could find no information about it online.
If it is more recent it could still be worth money but it is less likely to be worth a lot.
If the game was made before the 1990s it could have some value because based on the title it sounds like it might be a war game are electronic slot machines rigged usually had low print runs and there are collectors who really like war games.
A more recent game would have to be rare or was expensive to begin with to be worth a lot of money.
If the game looks like it would have cost quite a bit when it was first sold it could still retain some of that value.
One final thing that will matter is the condition of the game.
If the game has all of the pieces and they are in decent shape that is a positive.
If the game is missing pieces though or the pieces are in bad shape that will hurt the value.
Without being able to find anything about the game online it is kind of hard to judge the value of the game.
If you can provide me some more information about what type of game it is, the year it was made, or any other information from the box that might be helpful I could maybe give you a better answer.
Like, there are no copies I could find on either Amazon or E-bay, so I have no idea.
Before you brought the game to my attention, I had never heard of the game.
Generally the best area to find information about a board game is which you already looked at.
The game only has one version of the game on Board Game Geek so either no one has updated the page to indicate another printing run or there was only 500 copies of the game ever made.
Being made by a small company there is a good chance that there never was a second printing of the game.
On eBay I did find one copy of the game which was sold from the United Kingdom.
I think the game could be worth more than that copy sold for though.
The game probably sat for a while and the seller just wanted to get rid of it so they sold it really cheap.
The question is whether anyone is actually looking for the game.
Without much of a sales history for the game and little information on the game in general I am just making an educated guess based on the value of other similar games.
You might be able to get some money for the game but I would guess that it is not going to be a quick seller.
I wish I could help you more.
What would the value on an item like this?
I am assuming that you are talking about this.
A quick look at Amazon and eBay turned up no copies for sale.
With no recent sales record I can only make an educated guess which may be high or low.
Lets start with the positives.
Now for the negatives.
Some people like to collect board games from certain publishers but I doubt there is anyone that is collecting games specifically made by Sears.
Second as you mentioned your copy is missing one of the balls.
This will affect the value.
Some collectors refuse to buy incomplete copies of games.
The big question about the game is whether anyone is actually looking for it.
Before reading your comment I had never heard of the game and there is very little information about the game on Board Game Geek.
I am guessing that people please click for source be interested in the game if they knew about it but I wonder how many people are actually looking for it.
This is the key to the value of the game.
I am excited for the value of that amount as I purchased at estate sale.
Does anyone know where I can sell it and how much it is worth?
The only results I could find for Palladium involved a RPG and I am guessing that is not the game you are inquiring about.
Does the box give a specific date that it was created?
Is there any other information about the game on the box other than it being a mix of chess and checkers?
Without more information it is kind of hard to make an estimation about how much the game could be worth.
As far as where to sell the game your best guess would be what are best strategy games for android either list the game on eBay or if there is a local board game shop you may inquire if they purchase board games from customers.
I might need a little more information about your game.
Looking up Clobber on Board Game Geek returns five different games with that name.
I am guessing that your game is either the or the.
If it is not one of these two games can you give me any other information about the game?
I was unable to find either of these games on Amazon.
On eBay there have been a couple of both games listed over the last couple of months.
These copies were opened but complete.
Therefore I would say that these two games would probably not be worth a ton.
I would not consider it worthless though because people do prefer unopened copies of board games.
It is kind of hard to estimate a value though.
Unopened copies of games can sell for multiple times what an unopened copy does.
Of the two games I would guess that the Gabriel game would sell for more than the Waddingtons game.
I hope this helps.
Is it a rare edition?
Before reading your comment I had never heard of Monopoly Stock Exchange.
It turns out that this version of Monopoly is different than your normal Monopoly because players can buy shares in different properties which allows multiple people to own a share of the same property.
It also was designed by Reiner Knizia a well known board game designer and was apparently never officially released in the United States.
A value for the game is a little hard to pinpoint.
It has some value but it is not worth hundreds of dollars.
Amazon has two listings for it but there are no copies available under either listing: .
I hope this helps.
Honestly the only information I could really find for the game was by looking at the box.
First the game is pretty unknown since if it was more well known you should be able to find more about it online.
There are some positives for the game though.
First the game is sealed which always helps the value.
Second the game features an ex-NFL player.
While Larry Centers only played fullback in the NFL, there may be people who would collect things associated with him.
Third it appears that the game is uncommon or possibly rare with how little information there is about the game online.
The value of the game will be determined by how much interest there is in the game which is hard to judge with how little information there is about the game.
I wish I could give you a more definitive answer.
I hope this helped though.
I have an unopened 1991 pressman toy company The Adams Family card game.
I want to sell it.
Do you think there would be interest in it?
In my experience the stranger a game is the more likely it is to be worth money.
That is not always the case though.
I looked up your Addams Family card game and it seems to have a little value but not a ton.
If the game has a barcode you could make a listing for the game on Amazon.
It could take quite a while to sell on Amazon though.
I think the reason that the Addams Family card game 1991 version is not worth more is due to two things.
First the game is somewhat recent being made in the 1990s.
Also the game was made to capitalize on the 1991 movie which means that quite a few copies of the game were probably made.
I hope this helps.
There was a players club.
Is this of interest to collectors?
I am assuming you are talking about this.
I personally had never heard of the game but it actually sounds interesting.
It probably means that there is not a lot of interest in the game though so if you want to sell the game you will probably have to be really patient.
I hope this helps.
One is Campbell Kids Shopping Game.
I was wondering if this type of game would have any value.
I know there are some Campbell Soup collectors out there and just seeing if this type of game would sell and for what value.
I would guess at the very least that is is uncommon at this point.
The age 1955 should also help.
I would have two concerns with regards to value.
First the game was made by Parker Brothers which means that more copies of the game were probably made than most board games from the 1950s.
If the game was made by a smaller publisher possibly a company no longer in existence I would guess that the game would be more valuable since less copies would have been made.
This might not hurt the value that much though since collectors of Parker Brothers games may be interested in picking up the game for their collection.
Before bringing the game to my attention, I had never heard of it before.
Since the game was released quite a few years before I was born I obviously never played the game as a child.
People who have played the game before may have more interest in the game than I would though.
With how little information there is about the game are old games worth anything it is hard to judge the interest that there would be for the game.
If several people are looking for the game though the value could actually get pretty high if you were to put the game on eBay or a similar website and multiple people bid against one another.
As I already mentioned my value estimation is just an educated guess due to the little information I could find for the game.
If the game is quite rare though and multiple people are looking for the game I could see it going for a couple hundred dollars.
It will really come down to how much interest there is in the game though.
If you were planning on selling the game though you may have to be patient though since it might take a while to find someone interested enough in the game to pay what the game is worth.
I wish I could have been more helpful.
Do you know where I can find out of print game instructions?
Also, is there a site you recommend to get instructions from for any game?
Here on Geeky Hobbies I have reviewed around 400 different board games and I include a how to play section in every review.
Board Game Geek has a page for most board games except for some really niche games.
I looked up and it does have a Board Game Geek page.
If you leave a message on the forums for the game asking for instructions a user that owns the game may either give you a scan of the rules or could give you an overview of how to play the game.
It may take a little time though since only 16 people on the website own a copy of the game.
Games are:truth or consequences, michigan rummy, the wizard of oz, go the the head of the class, safely home, smess, finance, paydirt, san juan roulette, emergency, perfection,space tilt, tiddly winks and 13 dead end drive.
I will try to help you as much as I can.
For quite a few of the games I am going to need more information though since there have been many different versions of the game made over the years.
Paydirt has value but it is going to be hard to judge without knowing the year since the game was put out every year for quite a few years.
For Emergency I am assuming you are referring to.
As far as where to sell the games I have three recommendations.
If the game currently has a listing on Amazon, Amazon is probably the place where you are going to get the most for games.
The games have to have all of the pieces though to be sold on Amazon and it could take quite a while to find a buyer.
Your second option is eBay.
You should be able to sell the games quicker on eBay but you generally get less for board games on eBay than you would other places.
The third option I have would be.
Board Game Geek has a lot of board game collectors so you could try to find people who are interested in specific games.
I hope this helped.
Wondering if any are valuable.
Thanks for all the advice given on this web site!
Write me if any of the games pop out as valuable or rare.
After a quick look at your list here is my quick analysis.
The 1940s-1950s Monopoly is kind of hard to pinpoint since so many versions of the game was released during that period.
Condition will be a big determining factor.
Does the game have all of the other components that originally came with the game?
The main reason that Monopoly is not worth as much as you would probably expect is that Monopoly is probably the most popular board game of all time and thus millions of copies of the game have been made.
Most people would be fine with a new version of the game so I would guess that the older versions of the game will only appeal to collectors.
This is why condition is really important since collectors will likely be looking for the copies in the best condition.
Without anymore information that is about what I would estimate that it would be worth.
The rest of your games I have put in different price ranges.
These are just estimates and do fluctuate from time to time.
On average though this is about what I would expect you could get from the games.
All of these prices are based on copies that are complete https://agohome.ru/are/why-are-casinos-only-on-indian-reservations.html are in at least acceptable condition.
Honeymooners Game Sequence The following games I would need more information about because there are a lot of similar versions of the game that were created: Chess Teacher Wooden Maze I hope this was helpful.
My son wants to play it soooooooo bad and I want to keep it in the plastic in case it may be worth something someday.
I know these things would be difficult to predict, but in your expert opinion, do you think it will be worth something someday?
First does it say anywhere on the box how many copies of the game were made?
If there are no numbers printed on the box it usually means that the game was mass produced since companies usually like to promote that limited copies of the game were created.
If there were only a couple thousand copies of the game made I could see the value going up if there is future demand for the game.
Another question that I would have is whether this was a more expensive game from the start?
The game came out late last year so the current price probably still reflects the initial sale price of the game.
The final value of the game will be determined by how desired the game is by fans of the game.
It would probably take at least a couple years of the game being out of print before that would happen though.
If you were going to sell the game it would probably take some time to sell as well since most people would probably just buy one of the cheaper versions of the game.
I hope this was helpful.
A-26, looks like 1972 never opened and still wrapped in plastic.
While not worth a ton, Masterpiece has value.
Masterpiece in a game that was originally released in the 1970s where players bought and sold paintings in order to make money.
I have actually reviewed on Geeky Hobbies.
You will have to be patient though since it will probably take time to sell as you will have to wait for someone looking for a pristine copy.
Admirals is a little harder to estimate.
Admirals is a 1970s board game that is basically a naval version of the classic board game Stratego.
Currently Admirals is listed on Amazon but has no copies currently available for sale.
In general games on eBay sell for less than they do on Amazon.
This is just an estimate though.
I hope this helps.
Wondering if you knew a price for Hasbros 1973 The Batman Game?
If the game you are talking about isI found one copy of the game that sold on eBay a little over a month ago.
I would have to say that I was a little surprised that it sold for that little.
People are willing to spend more on something if they have a better idea of what they are getting.
Second with the game being sold on eBay it was unlikely to sell for as much as it could have since games tend to sell for less on eBay than other sites.
Finally I have a feeling that more copies of the game were made than I originally anticipated.
Companies like Hasbro seemed to start publishing larger quantities of board games in the 1970s and with a Batman license I am guessing that they made quite a few copies of the game.
These are just guesses though.
I hope this helps.
The other game is… Bunco by fundex games, ltd.
As far as value unfortunately neither game is really worth a lot.
I will preface this by saying that I am far from an expert on Monopoly.
As far as value Monopoly is one of the hardest board games to judge as there have been so many versions of the game released over the years.
Most versions of Monopoly are basically worthless but there are some versions that can be really valuable.
For older Monopolies usually the older it is the better.
Based solely on age the game has to be from the 1930s to have much value and not all 1930s versions are that valuable.
With so many copies in existence many old copies of Monopoly are not worth as much as you would expect as many copies still exist to this day.
Other than the really old versions of the game there are some very specific versions of the game that do have some value because they either had unique playing pieces or there is something unique about the components not present in any other versions of the game.
I know some of the sets created during wars that used non-metal playing pieces can have some value.
Does the game box or any of the components have a copyright date on them?
Seeing as I assume your version is quite old, the copyright date likely will be in Roman numerals.
That is mostly because there have been quite a few versions of Scrabble Junior made over the years.
To give you a more accurate picture about the value of the game I will need to know more information about your version of the game.
It would be helpful to know the publisher and the year of the game.
Just to get an idea I quickly looked up French versions of Scrabble on eBay.
I am guessing this is mostly due to there being quite a few copies of the French version of Scrabble please click for source there.
The one good thing for the value of your game is that it is still sealed.
Games that are sealed are worth considerably more than opened copies.
If you have an old version of the game it could be worth a decent amount with it being sealed.
I hope this helps.
Wondering if you could tell me game in are tested show jeopardy contestants the information regarding the sale of them.
Any ideas or suggestions?
Also, all pieces of each are accounted for, and pristine condition.
In the game players would move around a gameboard trying to finish their objectives while a VHS tape played in the background.
If you want to learn more about the series check out our review of.
The Nightmare and Atmosphere series are a series of board games that have maintained some value.
What is kind of strange about the Nightmare series is that the later games in the series are worth more than the earlier games.
I think this is mostly because the earlier versions were probably reprinted and the series probably started losing popularity towards the end.
Board games have never sold as well on eBay as they do on Amazon.
This is partially due to sellers not being patient and trying to sell things as quickly as possible.
A lot of these valuable board games have a particular audience so it takes time to find the right buyer.
If you were interested in selling the games my recommendation would depend on how quickly you wanted to get rid of them.
If you want to sell them quickly you are probably better off selling them on eBay but you likely will get less for them.
If you are willing to wait longer though you could probably get quite a bit more for them on Amazon.
I want to warn you though that they might take quite a while to sell on Amazon.
Unless you get lucky and find someone who wants them right away you may have to wait months or possibly over a year to sell them.
With Halloween coming up soon though you may be able to sell them quicker and might be able to get more for them from either site since people might want to play them for Halloween.
I hope this helps.
I cannot find this anywhere.
The copyright date shows 1955.
Do the numbers on the boxes mean anything.
This one has a 4521 on the lower left corner of the top and the same number in the lower right hand corner of the actual board game.
Any suggestions how to find more information?
As far as the numbers I believe the numbers are the catalog number for the game.
A lot of older games used to have these numbers.
I am not exactly sure what they were used for but I am guessing they were used to help with orders.
It has a spelling error on one of the spaces Carliol Square.
Does this make it any more desirable.
With a lot of collectibles, misprints do seem to add to the value.
Usually items with misprints or other errors are destroyed before they are sold so they are rarer than a normal version of the same item.
As far as how desirable this version of Monopoly is, I think it would come down to if this was a common misprint or not.
As far as how many were misprinted I honestly have no idea.
I will admit that I am far from an expert on Monopoly values as I am not a Monopoly collector myself.
I could see Monopoly experts being interested in a misprinted copy though.
I think it will mostly come down to how much interest there is in that version of Monopoly.
I wish I could have been of more help.
I was wondering if anyone could point me in the right direction.
Its called Thar she Blows!
I could send picture and it has directions and all the pieces.
This game was my grandfathers game as a kid.
Thanks for any info!
I tried to do some research on Thar She Blows!
This is not that surprising for a game from 1939.
My best guess on how to get more information about the game would be to ask a question about the game on the forums of.
I recommend asking the question on Board Game Geek because there are a lot of board game collectors on the site and a lot of users know about more obscure games.
With how many users there are on the site you might be able to find someone that is more familiar with the game.
If you were interested in how valuable the game is, the best I can do is to make a guess.
I am guessing that Thar She Blows was never reprinted so it is probably pretty rare.
The only question about the game being unknown is whether anyone even knows about it or even cares about it.
To get a better idea if people would be interested in the game, I would need a little more information about the game.
Do you know what type of game it is?
Basically can you quickly explain what you do in the game?
It would also be helpful to know what type of theme it has.
For example is it a war game?
Certain collectors are looking for certain types of games so some games have more value just based on the theme.
The best way to gauge a price is to look at what other copies of the game have sold for.
I hope this helps.
If you have slot machines actually random more information I will gladly try to help you as much as I can.
I have a vintage unopened, still in plastic 1974 Grand Master Mind Game.
Could you tell me what the value possibly is for this game?
Just for those who are not familiar with the game I would like to give a little information about the game itself.
Most people are familiar with the board game Mastermind.
With Mastermind being such a hit, over ten different sequels have been made for the game.
One of these sequels is Grand Mastermind.
Due to the fact that there is actually a strategy to automatically win Mastermind, most of these sequels added additional challenge to the game to make it harder to solve.
In Grand Mastermind another element is added to the game which forces players to figure out the color and shape of four different elements.
As far as value Grand Mastermind is rarer than the original version of Mastermind since Grand Mastermind was never reprinted unlike the original game.
As far as value the game has some value.
As I have mentioned in the post eBay prices tend to be lower side for board games though.
I will point out though if you were planning on selling the game on Amazon you will have to be patient since the game could take months to over a year to sell.
I hope this was helpful.
I would say that Marvel Zingo Heroes has some value but I think it is probably artificially high at this point.
I hope this was helpful.
Not even that it exists.
Ebay and google yeild nothing.
Gabriel Sons and Company New York.
Hoping you may be able to shed some light.
I will give you more if needed.
Or pics too… Thanks in advance.
Could you please help.
The Fraggle Trap Game is a board game based on the television show Fraggle Rock.
The game appears to be a roll and move style game which was made for younger children.
The game was made by Falcon Games which is a UK based board game publisher.
If you were planning on selling the game in the UK I would estimate the value would be around that much.
If so the value of the game would probably go up quite a bit maybe two to four times please click for source much as the copy that did sell since board game collectors generally like purchasing games that are still factory sealed.
As far as outside of the UK I think the valuation becomes a little more interesting.
Fraggle Rock is one of those shows that actually has quite a few fans which should drive demand for the game.
I am a little curious about how many copies of the game were made as I am not that familiar with Falcon Games.
Being a licensed product there probably were a decent amount of copies of the game produced but probably not as many copies as there would be if the game was produced in the United States.
In the United States we had our own Fraggle Rock game produced by Milton Bradley at around the same time as the Fraggle Trap game but the two games are totally different games.
Being a British game though I would guess Fraggle Trap would have more value as it would be quite a bit harder to find in the United States.
Selling board games internationally can be kind of a pain though.
Would love to know more specifics of the game and potential value.
For more information on the game I would recommend checking out the page as it has quite a bit of information about the game.
We also reviewed a similar game here on Geeky Hobbies called.
As far as value it is going to be kind of hard to judge.
There have been quite a few versions of the game created over the years.
There have even been some recent reprints of the game that have been made to look like the old versions of the game.
I think the value will mostly be reliant on how old the game truly is.
If the game is truly from the 1890s or the early 1900s I can see quite a bit of value as games that old are valuable due to the fact that not many of them are still in existence.
To get the most for the game though you would need to find a board game collector that is really interested in the age of the game.
The instruction sheet was copyright 1928 by Parker Brothers, Inc.
Can you tell me anything about this game?
Basically the game seems to be a collection of other board games Ludo, Auto Race, Checkers, and Backgammon.
Ludo, Checkers and Backgammon are animal online jam like some games what games that are over a hundred years old and are at this point public domain so anyone can legally make their own copy so there are many versions of the games available.
The game does seem like a pretty generic spin and move game though.
If you are looking for a value I can only make a guess.
It is not that easy to find games from 1928.
What hurts the value is that it is basically a collection of games with three of them being in the public domain.
The one outlier is Auto Race which might not have ever been reprinted.
There were quite a few similar racing games made in the same time period though and their values tend to differ quite a bit.
How many copies of the game are still in existence due to how old it is?
Also how interested are people in the Auto Race game?
Without any recent sales data I can only guess at the value.
Looked on Board Game Geek, Ebay and Amazon, no luck How can I know the value?
As far as value I can only take an educated guess.
There are some positive and negative things when it comes to the value.
First it is good that the game is unopened.
Some people are willing to pay quite a bit more for a game australia why expensive so video games in are it is still factory sealed since there is a guarantee that it will have all of the pieces and they will be in good shape.
The other potential benefit is that the game seems to have been made by a small publisher as I have never heard of Normatt Products.
On the other side though the thing that is working the most against the game is the fact that it is a trivia game.
There is a chance that might not be the case for Hit Record Trivia.
With the game check this out made in 1973 the audience for the game will be fans of music from that era that also like trivia games.
While there will probably be some people that are looking for that I would guess that the game will take quite a while to sell and might not sell for a lot.
I have the box with dice, pegs and tumblers, but no board.
I can send a photo.
The Game of India is a game that has been around for over 1,000 years so it is currently in the public domain which means anyone can produce their own version of the game.
This is one of the reasons why there have been so many different versions of the game produced over the years.
As far as value the game being in poor condition and missing the gameboard is not going to help.
If the game would have any real value if would be because of the age.
If the game is from the late 1800s or early 1900s the box and pieces may have some value to someone who collects old board games and is either missing the box or the pieces to the game.
In older games the copyright date is usually written in Roman numerals.
I hope this helped.
The parts remaining clearly identify it as the Parchisi variety.
What was most puzzling was no info on the maker, The Phillips Company.
Not losing sleep over it though.
I will toss it onto the web and see what happens.
I appreciate your comments!
Have a game that I could not find on amazon, ebay or board geek.
Rules booklet says made by Outwit Company box 2921 Los Angeles ca.
Can not find info on company.
Any help would be appreciated.
Do the rules for the game seem to be the same as this version of?
If the rules seem to be the same, I have the following theory about the game.
I am guessing your copy of the game was the first version of the game produced.
With the game being produced by the Outwit Company I am guessing that the game was self published as most games made by a company with the same name as the game itself are self published games.
The developer then either sent a copy of their game to Parker Brothers or someone at Parker Brothers discovered the game.
Parker Brothers then picked up the rights to publish the game which are the versions of the game you usually find.
The value is probably going to really depend on how many copies of the game were produced.
If the game were to have value the game would have had to be pretty rare and you would need to find someone that wants the original version of the game.
I wish I could have given you more information.
It seems more like the game of checkers, with slightly different rules and different shaped cloth game board.
Definitely, its a novelty and its interesting to speculate about it.
I certainly appreciate all your help and insight.
I am guessing that Portfolio was a generic version of Monopoly created to try and cash in on the popularity of Monopoly.
As far as value I can only give you a guess.
The fact that the game was produced to fit in a tube instead of a box probably means that the game was made by a smaller publisher.
This means that there probably were not that many copies of the game made but few people probably know about it.
If you are selling the game in the United States it could add to the value as the game would be harder to find in the United States.
I think the thing working against the game the most is the fact that it is a Monopoly clone game.
These type of games are usually not that much in demand as most people have their own version of Monopoly already.
As far as how to price the game this is a total guess.
You could always relist the game though and gradually lower the price until it sells.
I wish I could give you a better estimate but without being able to find any information about the game all I can do is guess about the value.
So mint mint condition.
Never opened, never played.
Never touched by human hands at all.
There are good things and bad things as it comes to the value of your Clue game.
There have been many different versions of Clue created over the years.
The game is also still made to this day so you can pick up a new copy of the game for cheap at almost any store.
The good news is that your copy of the game is still sealed.
Sealed copies of older games do maintain some value.
Unfortunately I am going to need more information about the game before I could make an estimation about whether the game has value.
Can you find the copyright date for the game?
If the game is an older version of Scrabble the copyright date will likely be in roman numerals.
It would also help to know if your Scrabble is a special edition or if it is just a normal version of Scrabble.
Generally speaking normal versions of Scrabble are not worth that much.
This is due to the game being popular and having been made for many years.
If a person is just looking for a copy of Scrabble they can easily find a cheap version of the game which means casual Scrabble players will not be the target audience if the game were valuable.
For the game to be valuable there would have to be something special about it that would appeal to fans and collectors of Scrabble.
If the game is one of the first sets made it may maintain some value.
Otherwise the game could have some value if there is something unique about your particular version of the game.
I wish I could have been more helpful.
On Board Game Geek I was only able to find one Wells Fargo game.
For those of you who are curious this Wells Fargo game has players retrieving stolen items and returning them for the reward money.
While the name is different, it seems like the game was also published under the name Wells Fargo Game as well.
I actually think your game may just be the Australian version of the game.
I say this because John Sands was responsible for printing a lot of Milton Bradley games publisher of Tales of Wells Fargo in Australia.
As far as Tales of Wells Fargo, the United States version of the game seems to be semi-valuable.
As far as the Australian version of the game I would guess the game would be around the same value.
If your game is different than the game I linked to you will probably have to give me some additional information since that is the only Wells Fargo board game that I was able to find.
If you can give me more information I will try to help you as much as I can.
It is a game called sssScat by Cadaco, Inc.
The price is still on the box.
Any information would be appreciated.
The game is not even listed on Board Game Geek which is strange since most board games except for games made by small publishers are on the site.
Basically the only thing I could find about the game is a couple of pictures.
If you had the game would you hold onto it or what would you do with it?
It is not in great shape, the box is pretty beaten but it seems complete.
I have no idea if anyone would be willing to buy it specially because it is in Spanish.
Can you help me out with this one?
On the positive side the game appears to be an older war game.
There are people that collect older war games and thus they can sell for quite a bit of money.
When you factor in that the game is in Spanish and is about South American battles specifically Chilean battles I would guess that the game was printed in South America most likely in Chile.
If this was the case it likely had an even more limited print run than a similar game that was produced in the United States.
With all these factors added together I would guess that the game might be pretty rare.
The second issue is that the game actually has a print and play version up on Board Game Geek.
Instead of buying an original copy of the game some people may prefer to just print out this version of the game.
I think quite a few of the people that would be interested in the game though would like the original version of the game.
I think the more important thing about the condition is whether the game has all of the components.
In these type of war games they are usually missing some of the little soldier pieces.
As a lot of copies lose pieces over time, a complete copy of the game will have quite a bit more value.
If possible I would recommend comparing what pieces you have with the pictures on the Board Game Geek page as they seem to picture all of the components that originally came with the game.
This is going to be hard to judge especially since I am not a huge war game fan myself.
It probably depends on how many people are interested in Chilean history.
I would think that there would eventually be someone that would be interested in the game but it might take quite a while to find a person that would pay a fair price for the game.
These value estimates are just guesses though as it is ultimately going to come down if there are people that really want the game.
I hope this was helpful.
From the 60s or 70s I guess.
What do you think?
It is a game made by a designer that clearly was not a fan of Nixon as the game revolves around one player playing as Nixon and the other players trying to beat him.
It sounds a lot like a Monopoly style game with a few tweaks.
For more information about the game check out its.
I did some research and found some copies of the game for sale on Amazon.
I have to say that I am a little surprised that the game is not worth more than it is.
I find only one or two listings for it on both Amazon and Board Game Geek and they all appear to be the same seller since they all show the same slightly crushed box.
Price seems very high.
It is in great condition, possibly never used.
The game was published in 1992.
Can you recommend anyone knowledgeable?
If you give me the name of the board game I would be willing to look into it.
I can find nothing anywhere.
It is very strange.
In my opinion I would guess that the issue with your game is probably a limited issue with the game.
When the board was being printed I am guessing there was some issue with the printer or it was smeared in some way during the process.
In my experience with other games that have blurred printing it is generally a limited problem that only affects a small number of copies of the game.
With misprints I think people are usually looking for typos, or other printing errors.
I could be wrong though as there might be Monopoly collectors that try to acquire as many misprinted games as possible.
Usually there is a way to contact the company at the end of the instructions or there should be information on their website.
The game sold 80,000 copies.
I have the original and certified copy member 1 along with some memorabilia including a copy of the TV commercial.
So you know of a specialist collector or auctioneer that might be interested please?
You could always list it on eBay but you may need to be patient as you wait for the right person to find your listing in order to get the most for it.
If you were to sell the item I would definitely detail these parts of the game as they should make the item sell for more.
I can not find it on Ebay or Amazon and was wondering where I can find a copy.
To me it would seem like there are no copies left or they are in private collections.
If you live in Europe I would assume the game would be easier to find as the game was only made in Britain which is not surprising as the game is about British politics.
If you live in the United States or outside of Europe I think the game will be quite a bit harder to find as most copies of the game are probably in Europe so shipping the game overseas will add quite a bit to the cost.
As far as where to purchase the game, at this time it looks like it is going to be hard to find.
There is an for the item but there are currently none for sale.
There are a couple of people on that have the game available for trade so you could maybe talk with them and see what they are willing to sell it for.
Otherwise I would keep monitoring the Amazon page as someone might eventually put the game up for sale.
I read recently on Google that if the item has a manufactured default it is worth more.
My game has different publish dates than the directions.
The directions are the right ones for the game.
The Monopoly games that are worth more are usually ones where the words are misspelled, the game has the wrong colors or other similar more noticeable errors.
I have a feeling that the discrepancy between the gameboard and the instructions can be attributed to one of two things.
If you bought the game used it could be due to a previous owner just mixing the board from one copy with the rules from another copy.
I think the more likely explanation is due to how older board games were created.
I have seen Monopoly and other games that have been reprinted several times having instructions dated significantly older than the rest of the game.
I hope this was helpful.
I was surprised to find out that the game the one made by Waffle House is worth more than I was expecting.
I am guessing this is mostly because the game was made by Waffle House.
These copies were used as well so your copy should be worth more.
Generally sealed copies tend to sell for around twice as much as an unsealed copy.
You might have to be patient though as you have to find someone who is interested in the game to get maximum value.
I am hoping someone can answer a question for me, I picked up a Cranium game in brand new condition at a thrift shop and when I looked it up I could only find a few for sale.
Its the Canadian edition 2.
I am wondering if this is really what I could sell it for?
I think this is the case because the American versions of Cranium are generally not worth that much.
What I am guessing is that there were other copies of the game for sale that sold.
After those copies sold there were no other copies left except for the overpriced copy.
How rare is this game, and is it worth anything?
I would say that the game is at least uncommon and may be rare.
I did find a copy that recently sold on eBay though.
I would guess you could sell it for that much if you wanted to sell it on eBay.
With it being more of an unknown game though I would caution you that it might take a while to sell the game for that price.
There is a good chance that you may have to list it a couple times before it actually sells.
I think it would eventually sell though.
I hope this helped.
I am guessing you are talking about this version of?
As far as value the best I can give you is an educated guess.
There are no listings on Amazon, eBay, or even Board Game Geek.
On the positive side the game actually appears to be pretty rare.
In addition to the game probably being rare, it is one of those niche games that tend to be valuable.
Games based on real events that also include some interesting well. what are the best shooting games for android something generally sell for more than games that are like many other games.
On the other hand the game is old enough that it has been out of print for a long time.
This likely means that not a lot of copies are still around today.
The game sounds like a roll and move game with a twist.
Games that are highly rated are more likely to sell as people want to play them as well as collect them.
Games with lower ratings still sell but they are sold more for their collectibility than actually wanting to play them.
The other factor potentially working against the game is the fact that the game appears to be pretty obscure.
A lot of people have probably never heard of the game before and thus it will be hard to find a market for the game.
It does not mean that there is not a market but if you plan on selling the game you might have to be patient as it likely will take some time.
The ultimate value is going to come down to finding someone who is interested in the game.
This might take some time so you might have to be patient if you are planning on selling it.
I have tried to research with no luck.
I can not find this game anywhere.
Singer1890New YorkUSA.
Under the name it reads.
Thank you for any help you can give me.
After some research I did find its page.
First of all does the game have the outer box and all of the components?
Is the machines legal in ca in good shape for its age?
The game will still have value if it is not in great shape but it will be worth even more if it is in good shape due to its age.
I think there are quite a few positives for the game and one potential issue.
Games made before 1900 generally have quite a bit of value as they are some of the oldest board games still in existence.
Another positive is that the game seems to have never been reprinted.
There are definitely people interested in board games from the 1800s.
The book apparently has photocopies of all of the boards, pieces and rules for all of the games featured.
Therefore if someone wanted to play the game they could just get the book.
This will drive away people that are only interested in playing the game.
There should still be people interested in purchasing the game as a collectible though.
I know board games from the 1800s that are in good shape can go for hundreds to even thousands of dollars.
As long as the game is not in terrible shape though, I would expect it to be quite valuable.
I have tried looking the game up itself and came up short and I tried getting some history on the company and no luck either.
I am guessing is not the game you are talking about as this is the only game I could find on Board Game Geek that even came close to your description.
Based on my experience, I would guess that your game was made by a small local publisher as I have never heard of Toys and Games of Nevada before.
I am guessing it was a game that was created to be sold as a souvenir for people visiting Las Vegas.
Most states seem to have these type of games that are made by local publisher that try to cash in on local attractions.
Based on what these type of games are normally like, I would guess that it is either a Monopoly style game or a trivia game about Las Vegas.
This is due to a couple factors.
The one positive for your game though is that it is based on Las Vegas.
There might not be a lot of people interested in the game itself but there are quite a few people interested in Las Vegas.
With the game featuring casinos that are no longer available, that should add to its value for Las Vegas collectors.
I would guess that people who collect Las Vegas items would be interested in the game.
It is in a black case and I have never heard of it.
I looked it up online and see some versions of it but they seem to be a different model.
Can you tell me more about it?
Is it worth anything?
I would love to learn more about it and if it has any value.
Looking at Board Game Geek I found this.
Here are the different of the game.
Is your game one of the versions shown?
The game I linked to is a board game similar to Monopoly that involves purchasing and selling oil.
The first page I linked to has a list of what originally came with the game if you wanted to check if your game has all of the original components.
I hope this helped.
My version is different.
Is the gameplay similar to what is outlined on the page I linked to a Monopoly style game?
If it is a special edition it should add some value to the game.
How much it adds will come down to how much someone is looking for the game.
Never been played, cardboard bits almost all still unpunched.
Still has the old order forms etc.
Box is in excellent condition too.
I feel like this would be worth something but hard to know where to start!
Any ideas if this is valuable?
First of all, yes the crayons are used in the game.
Basically in the game you run a railroad company that is trying to build a train network to make the most money.
The crayons are used to draw on the map to indicate which track lines you own.
As far as value I would put the game in the valuable but not super valuable range.
Empire Builder is actually a pretty popular board game that inspired a whole line of train board games.
On the positive side there is going to be a market for the game.
Especially with the game being the first edition and being unplayed, there will be people interested in buying the game.
On the negative side the game has been reprinted at least seven different times throughout the years.
There will be people interested in the first edition, but the additional versions will probably drop the value some.
I hope this helped.
Amazon, eBay, game board geeks.
The only information I could find about it was that they generally make versions of public domain games like Chess, Checkers, and Backgammon.
As it is a public domain game no one own the rights to the game so anyone can make and sell their own setmost sets of Backgammon are not worth much money.
At the same time though https://agohome.ru/are/ares-casino-auszahlung.html are a lot of Backgammon fans.
People who are really into Backgammon are willing to spend money on high quality sets.
The value of your set is going to depend on the component quality and the age.
If the set is well made and was expensive when it was first made, it will probably still have value.
Also if the set is really old 100+ years old I could see it having some value.
It is in good condition and appears to have all the pieces.
It was released in 1986.
I found information on Board Game Geek, but did not find any pricing information.
Is this game worth that much or is that the seller just picking their own price?
Before your comment I had never heard of Stealth before.
After some brief research the game actually looks pretty interesting as it combines a sci-fi theme with an abstract game.
One comment even mentioned that the game is rare.
The game has all the makings of a game that could be worth that much or even more.
The actual price is going to come down to the demand for the game though.
For these type of games that most people have never heard of, the price comes down to if someone is looking for the game.
The game seems rare enough and has all of the things I look for when estimating whether a game will be valuable.
If someone is looking for the game I would guess they would be willing to pay around the price of the eBay listing.
I am not familiar enough with the game to know whether there is a real demand for it.
One thing I know for sure though is that you likely will have to be patient if you ultimately end up choosing to sell the game.
I hope this was helpful.
Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published.
Notify me of new posts by email.
To support the blog and keep it free for all users, Geeky Hobbies utilizes various affiliate programs to earn commissions.
We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.
We are also members of the eBay Partner Network.

T7766547
Bonus:
Free Spins
Players:
All
WR:
30 xB
Max cash out:
$ 1000

I wouldn’t attempt to sell old gaming stuff on Ebay either, I feel it’s just a huge hassle. Like I’ve got a couple of older NIS or Atlus games that would be worth a lot today but I won’t bother trying to selling them online to someone who might or might not be reliable just for a 30-40 dollars profit margin.


Enjoy!
The best classic PC games still worth playing | PCWorld
Valid for casinos
HTTP Error 403
Visits
Dislikes
Comments
SLIDESHOW 15 classic PC games you should play again Text adventures.
We round up all the games you should've played back when you had 64MB of SDRAM.
Between a flood of HD remasters, and all the games styled to look like older gamesreleased in the past year, I think we can all agree retro games are back in style.
But what about actual retro games—the classics you've left gathering dust in old CD-ROM cases or are hoarding in your GOG.
April's a relatively slow month as far as new releases, so maybe it's the perfect time to revisit some old classics.
I'm about to go replay Planescape: Torment.
Read on for that and fourteen ish other classic games you should play again.
Before Pillars of Eternity, there were the Infinity Engine games.
Of that fairly large collection of isometric RPGs, the two that stand above the rest are and.
Baldur's Gate II has a decent story for a fantasy game, but is mostly notable for being absolutely massive.
Planescape: Torment is iconic for its dialogue and story—you can even avoid combat completely, if you're good enough.
Modern perspective: Baldur's Gate II: Enhanced Edition is a decent albeit buggy option if you want a slightly modernized version of the game—widescreen, plus some small mechanics tweaks.
Otherwise these games are about as approachable now as they were upon release.
The game is a blend of both exploration and really satisfying turn-based combat, with you controlling an army of mythical creatures led by the titular heroes.
There've been a lot of Heroes of Might and Magic games over the years, but if you can look past the dated graphics then this third entry is simply the best.
Modern perspective: I beg of you: Stay away from the HD version Ubisoft released earlier this year.
Yeah, the graphics are better.
Yeah, widescreen is nice.
But most of the content is missing, due to some issues with lost source code.
You're better off sticking with the original plus expansions.
You'll meet people in the games industry who still play Deus Ex once per year.
The key to Deus Ex is choice, both in terms of story and mechanics.
Levels are almost infinitely replayable, due to the enormous number of ways you could approach each objective.
This is level design stretched to its absolute limits, and never before nor since have we had a game that gave players this much freedom.
No, not even in the game's two sequels.
Modern perspective: The biggest obstacle to playing Deus Ex is the opening level.
Liberty Island is commonly considered the worst level in the whole game.
Just push through it.
Fact: Space sims are great.
Fact: Space sims are even better when they're Star Wars-branded.
After an interminable wait, the classic Star Wars games finally made their way to a store again, and chief amongst them are and.
Modern perspective: The one major downside?
The definitive CD versions of both games aren't currently available.
The CD versions upped the resolution, added full voiceovers, and improved the cutscenes, so it's a shame they're not included yet.
Maybe down the road?
Or you could just play.
Maybe you played point-and-click puzzler Myst—after all, it held the record for best-selling PC game for nearly a decade—but did you play its sequel?
Bigger, bolder, and more sure of itself, Riven is every bit as much a classic as its predecessor, and also forms a more cohesive whole.
Plus now you can just download it instead of needing to install five or six different CD-ROMs.
Modern perspective: On the other hand, be prepared to beat your head against a wall.
Riven is fiendishly difficult at times.
And it just laughs at your big dumb brain.
Probability of your consulting a are old games worth anything 99 percent.
Okay, "a person" celebrated in the streets.
I did a little dance.
The spiritual predecessor to BioShock, System Shock 2 will feel familiar—first-person, heavy emphasis on story, et cetera—but with a creepy "survival horror in space" feel.
Not only is it a good game in its more info right, it's also influenced pretty much every shooter to come after.
Modern perspective: Install some graphics mods.
Make the game really shine the way it should.
System Shock 2 is beloved enough that you have some great options on modern systems.
Oh and by the way: It's difficult.
It's easily one of the longest, deepest adventure games ever made, with one of the greatest worlds in all of gaming history—and it released right when the point-and-click genre basically died off.
Modern perspective: Some of the puzzles are asinine, so be prepared to consult a walkthrough.
It's worth it for the story though.
And lucky for you, when you're done you won't have to wait eight years.
With a recent Kickstarter campaign tonow would be a perfect time for you to re visit the mother of all CRPGs.
Playing all of the Ultima games would take forever though, so you might as well start with the best—either or.
The two play very different Ultima 7 uses a top-down perspective, while Underworld 2 is first-person but they have one thing in common: They're both phenomenal RPGs.
Set aside dozens of hours for these adventures.
Disappointed by last year's?
Well, it is admittedly hard to live up to being the spiritual predecessor oflargely considered to be one of the best if not the best 4X games ever created.
Modern perspective: It's basically Civilization's turn-based strategy, but in space.
Civilization II, are old games worth anything be exact.
It's not as pretty as booting up Civilization V, obviously, but it's not too hard to puzzle out.
And if you're looking for more space-based strategy, try out.
I have a tendency to recommend a lot too muchso I thought I'd choose a different golden-era point-and-click this time around:.
This murder-mystery game is really just incredible, from its rotoscoped art style to its unique setting riding on a train in 1914 under the specter of World War I to the fact that the plot progresses in real-time.
Fun fact: The game was written by Jordan Mechner, who created Prince of Persia.
Modern perspective: As far as point-and-clicks go, The Last Express is pretty approachable.
That being said, the fact that the game progresses in real-time means two things.
If you love the idea of the isometric CRPG but don't really care for fantasy settings, try instead.
Yes, this is what Fallout was before Bethesda turned it into " Elder Scrolls with guns.
I love Fallout 3.
There's a quality and a humor to the writing in Fallout 2, though, that puts it on a higher level—a cleverness that just didn't quite make it into Bethesda's iteration.
It's a damn good CRPG.
Modern perspective: If you're coming over from Fallout 3, this is going to take some getting visit web page to.
However, if you have any experience with isometric CRPGs you should be fine.
A Mind Forever Voyaging is a text adventure nowadays known as "interactive fiction" that's as much an indictment of certain political leanings as it is an examination of the nature of being human.
It's also one of the most ambitious text adventures of the era, with time constantly advancing and an enormous amount of locations to see.
Who needs graphics, when you've got a story this good?
Sure, it's not exactly on par with Brave New World and 1984 the way Infocom claimed, but it's still excellent in part because it's a game and not a novel.
Modern perspective: The hardest part of playing A Mind Forever Voyaging nowadays is finding a copy.
A legal copy, that is.
Also, the game came with "feelies"—physical items packed into the box that would be helpful to have on hand while playing.
No, I'm not talking about the 2012 shooter.
I'm are old games worth anything about the game that game was "based on," the 1993 isometric tactics game from Bullfrog.
Basically, you're the leader of a global megacorporation, and your only goal is.
Be the best megacorporation on Earth.
To do so, you hire a group of mercenaries to do some really shady things, because that's how the world works in 2096.
The game consists primarily of directing these mercenaries through various levels.
Modern perspective: The UI and graphics are the biggest hamper to enjoying Syndicate nowadays, but they're sort of charming in a retro-cyberpunk way.
Also, as of the time of writing thanks to EA's On the House program, so get on it.
In the 90s, especially with the advent of CD storage, we went through this weird phase known as "FMV Games," short for full-motion video.
Basically, instead of using computer graphics people would shoot film clips of live actors.
It's a quintessentially 90s genre, and the pinnacle was.
You play as the titular Tex, a film noir detective for the post-apocalypse.
Modern perspective: The game's got some fairly stupid puzzles, but luckily there's a pretty decent hint system built in.
You might might actually be able to complete this one without a walkthrough, are old games worth anything is high praise for a 90s adventure game.
Duke is like that obnoxious guest who showed up at your party uninvited, drank all your beer, creeped everyone out, broke something, threw up on your floor, and then passed out.
And is Duke at his Dukiest.
If you want to play one shooter to understand what the 90s FPS scene was like, Duke Nukem 3D is a pretty good choice.
Modern perspective: Some of the pop culture references don't really hold up, but that's okay.
Also, the game is a 90s shooter, so expect it to be fast.
Way faster than whatever you're currently playing.
After we published this list, readers pointed out some big, gaping holes in it—and we listened.
Now that you know the golden oldies that we still love to play, check out the reader picks for.
PCWorld helps you navigate the PC ecosystem to find the products you want and the advice you need to get the job done.